2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324158
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Innovative Model for Emergency Department Behavioral Health Care
Author(s):
Young, Tiffany
Author Details:
Tiffany Young, MA, BSN, RN, email: tiyoung@wakemed.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: For complex and numerous reasons, in recent years emergency departments (EDs) have been flooded with behavioral health patients. While ED staff often lack the expertise needed to care for them, a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) is trained to assess, diagnose, and treat this population. The purpose of this project was to determine if the addition of a PMHNP would provide efficacious care to behavioral health clients presenting to an urban ED. Design: A systematic literature review was performed to determine if the evaluation and assessment by a PMHNP could increase timely access to therapeutic care for behavioral health patients in the ED. The literature review was the first step in a project to investigate if this model of care could be piloted in an urban ED that sees 120,000 patients a year. Setting: Methodological literature review limited to the use of PMHNPs in EDs. Participants/Subjects: This review did not discriminate on demographic variables; the participants were patients in EDs. Methods: This literature review was restricted to the years 2002-2013. CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases were searched using the key terms ‘mental health nurse practitioner’, ‘emergency department’, ‘mental health or psychiatric’, ‘nurse practitioner’, ‘hospital emergency department’, ‘psychiatric emergencies’, and ‘mental health services.’ A manual search through the reference lists of retrieved publications was also conducted. Forty-seven publications met the search criteria; further evaluation by the investigator culled a total of 7 that met the prescribed criteria. Results/Outcomes: The results of the literature review strongly suggest that a PMHNP in the ED can improve outcomes for behavioral health patients. For example, the addition of a PMHNP was shown to reduce time that patients spend waiting for therapeutic care. In one large study, a PMHNP was able to see 40% (n=235) of behavioral health patients within one hour of triage. As a result, patients were better supported therapeutically and spent less time in the department because of this expert assessment. Qualitative reports of both ED staff and consumers also indicated that the PMHNP model in the ED provided timely access to an expert assessment and therapeutic interventions, as well as coordinated care in an area where behavioral health care is creating a crisis for providers and patients. Implications: The lack of focused community resources combined with the inefficiency of current models of care for behavioral health patients who present to EDs suggests that a new model be implemented. Multiple Australian studies have shown that a PMHNP in the ED can reduce waiting times for therapeutic care, ultimately improving throughput. The next step in this project is to implement this strategy and evaluate its effectiveness.
Keywords:
ED Behavioral Health Care
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Innovative Model for Emergency Department Behavioral Health Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Tiffanyen_GB
dc.author.detailsTiffany Young, MA, BSN, RN, email: tiyoung@wakemed.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324158-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: For complex and numerous reasons, in recent years emergency departments (EDs) have been flooded with behavioral health patients. While ED staff often lack the expertise needed to care for them, a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) is trained to assess, diagnose, and treat this population. The purpose of this project was to determine if the addition of a PMHNP would provide efficacious care to behavioral health clients presenting to an urban ED. Design: A systematic literature review was performed to determine if the evaluation and assessment by a PMHNP could increase timely access to therapeutic care for behavioral health patients in the ED. The literature review was the first step in a project to investigate if this model of care could be piloted in an urban ED that sees 120,000 patients a year. Setting: Methodological literature review limited to the use of PMHNPs in EDs. Participants/Subjects: This review did not discriminate on demographic variables; the participants were patients in EDs. Methods: This literature review was restricted to the years 2002-2013. CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases were searched using the key terms ‘mental health nurse practitioner’, ‘emergency department’, ‘mental health or psychiatric’, ‘nurse practitioner’, ‘hospital emergency department’, ‘psychiatric emergencies’, and ‘mental health services.’ A manual search through the reference lists of retrieved publications was also conducted. Forty-seven publications met the search criteria; further evaluation by the investigator culled a total of 7 that met the prescribed criteria. Results/Outcomes: The results of the literature review strongly suggest that a PMHNP in the ED can improve outcomes for behavioral health patients. For example, the addition of a PMHNP was shown to reduce time that patients spend waiting for therapeutic care. In one large study, a PMHNP was able to see 40% (n=235) of behavioral health patients within one hour of triage. As a result, patients were better supported therapeutically and spent less time in the department because of this expert assessment. Qualitative reports of both ED staff and consumers also indicated that the PMHNP model in the ED provided timely access to an expert assessment and therapeutic interventions, as well as coordinated care in an area where behavioral health care is creating a crisis for providers and patients. Implications: The lack of focused community resources combined with the inefficiency of current models of care for behavioral health patients who present to EDs suggests that a new model be implemented. Multiple Australian studies have shown that a PMHNP in the ED can reduce waiting times for therapeutic care, ultimately improving throughput. The next step in this project is to implement this strategy and evaluate its effectiveness.en_GB
dc.subjectED Behavioral Health Careen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:33Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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