2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324161
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Security Program to Increase Safety in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Evans, Darci A.
Author Details:
Darci A. Evans, BSN, RN, email: devans@uwhealth.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The Emergency Nurses Association has named workplace violence as one of three practice priorities. Findings from their Violence Surveillance Study stated that 54.5% of nurses surveyed reported experiencing physical and/or verbal abuse from a patient and/or visitor in the past week. Long wait times, patients and visitors impaired from substance use and abuse and patients and/or families in crisis can enhance the risk for violence. Design: The safety plan was developed as a quality improvement project after the ED staff raised concerns about feeling unsafe. ED administration invited individuals from nursing, law enforcement, hospital security, and social work to create a comprehensive security plan. Setting: The 34-bed ED is a Level 1 adult and pediatric trauma center in a Midwestern academic medical center. This ED has approximately 48,000 patient visits per year. Participants: All ED and security staff attended a four-hour educational session that included classroom and practical scenarios. Methods: This security program operates on the premise that the Emergency Department is in one of three statuses: Green, Yellow or Red. During times of normal operation the department is in a green status. A yellow status conveys to staff that they should have a heightened sense of awareness as a potential security risk exists. A red status indicates there is a significant risk to staff and/or patient safety. Lights are strategically placed at ceiling level and are visible to all staff in the ED, waiting room and at departmental entry points. When a threat is identified the ED Charge Nurse, Attending physician, security supervisor and the nursing coordinator huddle for a brief discussion and determination of status. Each status has a well-defined plan for security response, visitor guidelines and ED access. Notification of staff occurs through an initial audible alarm and color change of the ceiling lights. Results/Outcomes: The ED experienced more injuries resulting in missed work days prior to implementation of the education and security plan. Since implementation there have been no lost work days due to staff injury. Security status changes and staff assaults are tracked. The year following the education, staff assaults were decreased by 50 % with only three incidents. That same year, the ED security status changed 14 times. The following year, staff assaults decreased to 2 incidents with ED security status changing 11 times. Providing education and a clear method for communicating potential safety threats promoted staff and patient safety. ED staff had a clear action plan based on the ED security status. Implications: The implications for development of a formal security plan are great. This plan has helped to reduce the number of injuries and has increased a sense of security among staff. All emergency departments can benefit from assessing their security needs and implementing a department specific security plan.
Keywords:
Safety in the ED
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Security Program to Increase Safety in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Darci A.en_GB
dc.author.detailsDarci A. Evans, BSN, RN, email: devans@uwhealth.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324161-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: The Emergency Nurses Association has named workplace violence as one of three practice priorities. Findings from their Violence Surveillance Study stated that 54.5% of nurses surveyed reported experiencing physical and/or verbal abuse from a patient and/or visitor in the past week. Long wait times, patients and visitors impaired from substance use and abuse and patients and/or families in crisis can enhance the risk for violence. Design: The safety plan was developed as a quality improvement project after the ED staff raised concerns about feeling unsafe. ED administration invited individuals from nursing, law enforcement, hospital security, and social work to create a comprehensive security plan. Setting: The 34-bed ED is a Level 1 adult and pediatric trauma center in a Midwestern academic medical center. This ED has approximately 48,000 patient visits per year. Participants: All ED and security staff attended a four-hour educational session that included classroom and practical scenarios. Methods: This security program operates on the premise that the Emergency Department is in one of three statuses: Green, Yellow or Red. During times of normal operation the department is in a green status. A yellow status conveys to staff that they should have a heightened sense of awareness as a potential security risk exists. A red status indicates there is a significant risk to staff and/or patient safety. Lights are strategically placed at ceiling level and are visible to all staff in the ED, waiting room and at departmental entry points. When a threat is identified the ED Charge Nurse, Attending physician, security supervisor and the nursing coordinator huddle for a brief discussion and determination of status. Each status has a well-defined plan for security response, visitor guidelines and ED access. Notification of staff occurs through an initial audible alarm and color change of the ceiling lights. Results/Outcomes: The ED experienced more injuries resulting in missed work days prior to implementation of the education and security plan. Since implementation there have been no lost work days due to staff injury. Security status changes and staff assaults are tracked. The year following the education, staff assaults were decreased by 50 % with only three incidents. That same year, the ED security status changed 14 times. The following year, staff assaults decreased to 2 incidents with ED security status changing 11 times. Providing education and a clear method for communicating potential safety threats promoted staff and patient safety. ED staff had a clear action plan based on the ED security status. Implications: The implications for development of a formal security plan are great. This plan has helped to reduce the number of injuries and has increased a sense of security among staff. All emergency departments can benefit from assessing their security needs and implementing a department specific security plan.en_GB
dc.subjectSafety in the EDen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:35Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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