"Little White Pill": Improving Accuracy of Emergency Department Medication History

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324163
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Little White Pill": Improving Accuracy of Emergency Department Medication History
Author(s):
Sewell, Jane L.
Author Details:
Jane L. Sewell, BSN, RN, CEN, email: jsewell@aultman.com
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Accurate and complete medication reconciliation upon admission to the hospital is essential for patient safety. However, due to high patient volume and other factors, it is often difficult for emergency department (ED) nurses to devote adequate time to obtaining detailed medication histories. The implementation of ED-based pharmacy technicians can offer a solution to these issues. Design: An interdisciplinary process improvement initiative was launched to improve medication reconciliation for admitted ED patients. As a result of this initiative, ED-based pharmacy technicians were hired to complete patient medication histories. Setting: The setting is an urban level II trauma center with approximately 86,000 visits annually. Participants/Subjects: The ED pharmacy technicians focus their attention on obtaining medication histories for hospital admission, so admitted ED patients are the population most affected by this change in practice. Methods: A series of process improvement meetings were held throughout 2012 to address concerns surrounding inaccurate ED medication histories on admitted patients. Leaders from the ED, clinical informatics, inpatient units, and the medical staff were in attendance. Inpatient nursing variances related to ED medication history were examined, as were the perceptions of inpatient physicians. Literature noting common ED barriers to effective medication reconciliation was considered, and current trends regarding ED-based pharmacy personnel were investigated. As a result of this process, pharmacy technicians were officially instituted in the ED on January 21, 2013. The technicians staff the ED from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. and they complete the majority of medication history documentation on admitted patients. Results/Outcomes: When compared to the first quarter of 2012, inpatient variances related to the inaccuracy of ED medication histories were reduced by 89% during the first quarter of 2013. In addition, ED nurse satisfaction rose significantly, with 98.3% of nurses surveyed stating that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the ED medication by history process after the pharmacy technician program was instituted. This number contrasts with the 86.7% of nurses who stated that they were either unsatisfied or very unsatisfied with the process prior to utilization of pharmacy technicians. Finally, 96.7% of ED nurses surveyed agreed that they have more time for patient care. Implications: The use of ED-based pharmacy technicians to obtain medication histories can potentially increase patient safety and reduce the time that nurses spend away from the bedside. These benefits are significant in light of the fast pace and high acuity of ED nursing.
Keywords:
Improving ED Med History; Patient Safety in ED
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Little White Pill": Improving Accuracy of Emergency Department Medication Historyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSewell, Jane L.en_GB
dc.author.detailsJane L. Sewell, BSN, RN, CEN, email: jsewell@aultman.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324163-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Accurate and complete medication reconciliation upon admission to the hospital is essential for patient safety. However, due to high patient volume and other factors, it is often difficult for emergency department (ED) nurses to devote adequate time to obtaining detailed medication histories. The implementation of ED-based pharmacy technicians can offer a solution to these issues. Design: An interdisciplinary process improvement initiative was launched to improve medication reconciliation for admitted ED patients. As a result of this initiative, ED-based pharmacy technicians were hired to complete patient medication histories. Setting: The setting is an urban level II trauma center with approximately 86,000 visits annually. Participants/Subjects: The ED pharmacy technicians focus their attention on obtaining medication histories for hospital admission, so admitted ED patients are the population most affected by this change in practice. Methods: A series of process improvement meetings were held throughout 2012 to address concerns surrounding inaccurate ED medication histories on admitted patients. Leaders from the ED, clinical informatics, inpatient units, and the medical staff were in attendance. Inpatient nursing variances related to ED medication history were examined, as were the perceptions of inpatient physicians. Literature noting common ED barriers to effective medication reconciliation was considered, and current trends regarding ED-based pharmacy personnel were investigated. As a result of this process, pharmacy technicians were officially instituted in the ED on January 21, 2013. The technicians staff the ED from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m. and they complete the majority of medication history documentation on admitted patients. Results/Outcomes: When compared to the first quarter of 2012, inpatient variances related to the inaccuracy of ED medication histories were reduced by 89% during the first quarter of 2013. In addition, ED nurse satisfaction rose significantly, with 98.3% of nurses surveyed stating that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the ED medication by history process after the pharmacy technician program was instituted. This number contrasts with the 86.7% of nurses who stated that they were either unsatisfied or very unsatisfied with the process prior to utilization of pharmacy technicians. Finally, 96.7% of ED nurses surveyed agreed that they have more time for patient care. Implications: The use of ED-based pharmacy technicians to obtain medication histories can potentially increase patient safety and reduce the time that nurses spend away from the bedside. These benefits are significant in light of the fast pace and high acuity of ED nursing.en_GB
dc.subjectImproving ED Med Historyen_GB
dc.subjectPatient Safety in EDen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:37Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:37Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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