2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324166
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence in the Emergency Department: All in a Day's Work
Author(s):
Becker, Meredith; Dunn, Elizabeth; Copeland, Darcy; Brauninger, Jason
Author Details:
Meredith Becker, BSN, RN, CEN, email: meredithbecker@centura.org; Elizabeth Dunn, BSN, RN; Darcy Copeland, PhD, RN; Jason Brauninger, BSN, RN, CEN
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose – Violence in emergency departments is well documented, as is the lack of reporting of violence among healthcare workers in general. What is missing is how the prevalence of violence, lack of reporting and perception of safety in the workplace are inter-related, particularly from a multidisciplinary perspective. The purpose of this study was to understand the perception of safety and the prevalence of and reporting of violence in the emergency department from a multidisciplinary perspective. The aim was to identify ways in which leadership can decrease workplace violence, increase reporting of violence and/or enhance a sense of safety among all emergency department employees. Design – This descriptive study used a cross-sectional design. Setting – A major metropolitan Level One Trauma Center. Participants – All 235 full and part time emergency department staff members were invited to participate, 153 participated (65% response rate). Participants included: RNs (56), MD/DOs (28), Radiology Technicians (24), Laboratory Technicians (10), PAs (9), Psychiatric RNs (5), Critical Care Technicians (5), Unit Secretaries (5), Psychiatric Assessors (3), Phlebotomists (3), Nuclear Medicine/Ultrasound Technicians (3), and Registration Clerks (2).Methods – Upon receipt of IRB approval, a link to an anonymous online survey was emailed to all ED staff members. The survey included demographic questions, questions regarding workplace violence (based on the Emergency Nurses’ Association definition) including perceptions of tolerance, workplace safety, types of violence experienced, frequency of violence experienced, frequency of incident reporting and barriers to reporting. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. Statistical significance was set at p  .05. Results/Outcomes –The majority of respondents (87%) experienced some form of violence in the past six months and (64%) agreed that “violence is an expected part of the job.” Females, day shift employees, and employees between 31-40 years of age reported experiencing more violence than their counterparts. RNs experienced more violence than any other discipline, however, some form of violence had been experienced by all disciplines; however, 98% of respondents reported feeling safe at work, females significantly more (p=.05). Verbal abuse was the most frequently reported form of violence experienced and patients were perpetrators more frequently than family members/visitors. The majority of respondents (65%) did not report any violence experienced; the primary reason for not reporting was “nobody was hurt” (37%) and the most common recommendation (55%) for creating a safer environment was adoption of a zero tolerance policy. Implications – This study highlights the prevalence of violence experienced by staff members from a variety of disciplines working in the ED as well as the global lack of reporting of violence. It is crucial that barriers to reporting violent events be resolved in order to create a safe work environment. As a result, the ED Safety Initiative Team is focusing on three key areas: changing the culture related to need for reporting of violent events outside of the patient chart, creating a convenient method to report violence that is accessible to all ED employees, and development and implementation of a Zero Tolerance Policy.
Keywords:
Violence
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence in the Emergency Department: All in a Day's Worken_GB
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Meredithen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCopeland, Darcyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrauninger, Jasonen_GB
dc.author.detailsMeredith Becker, BSN, RN, CEN, email: meredithbecker@centura.org; Elizabeth Dunn, BSN, RN; Darcy Copeland, PhD, RN; Jason Brauninger, BSN, RN, CENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324166-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose – Violence in emergency departments is well documented, as is the lack of reporting of violence among healthcare workers in general. What is missing is how the prevalence of violence, lack of reporting and perception of safety in the workplace are inter-related, particularly from a multidisciplinary perspective. The purpose of this study was to understand the perception of safety and the prevalence of and reporting of violence in the emergency department from a multidisciplinary perspective. The aim was to identify ways in which leadership can decrease workplace violence, increase reporting of violence and/or enhance a sense of safety among all emergency department employees. Design – This descriptive study used a cross-sectional design. Setting – A major metropolitan Level One Trauma Center. Participants – All 235 full and part time emergency department staff members were invited to participate, 153 participated (65% response rate). Participants included: RNs (56), MD/DOs (28), Radiology Technicians (24), Laboratory Technicians (10), PAs (9), Psychiatric RNs (5), Critical Care Technicians (5), Unit Secretaries (5), Psychiatric Assessors (3), Phlebotomists (3), Nuclear Medicine/Ultrasound Technicians (3), and Registration Clerks (2).Methods – Upon receipt of IRB approval, a link to an anonymous online survey was emailed to all ED staff members. The survey included demographic questions, questions regarding workplace violence (based on the Emergency Nurses’ Association definition) including perceptions of tolerance, workplace safety, types of violence experienced, frequency of violence experienced, frequency of incident reporting and barriers to reporting. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS software. Statistical significance was set at p  .05. Results/Outcomes –The majority of respondents (87%) experienced some form of violence in the past six months and (64%) agreed that “violence is an expected part of the job.” Females, day shift employees, and employees between 31-40 years of age reported experiencing more violence than their counterparts. RNs experienced more violence than any other discipline, however, some form of violence had been experienced by all disciplines; however, 98% of respondents reported feeling safe at work, females significantly more (p=.05). Verbal abuse was the most frequently reported form of violence experienced and patients were perpetrators more frequently than family members/visitors. The majority of respondents (65%) did not report any violence experienced; the primary reason for not reporting was “nobody was hurt” (37%) and the most common recommendation (55%) for creating a safer environment was adoption of a zero tolerance policy. Implications – This study highlights the prevalence of violence experienced by staff members from a variety of disciplines working in the ED as well as the global lack of reporting of violence. It is crucial that barriers to reporting violent events be resolved in order to create a safe work environment. As a result, the ED Safety Initiative Team is focusing on three key areas: changing the culture related to need for reporting of violent events outside of the patient chart, creating a convenient method to report violence that is accessible to all ED employees, and development and implementation of a Zero Tolerance Policy.en_GB
dc.subjectViolenceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:42Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:42Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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