2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324170
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
There's a SIM in my Bed
Author(s):
Fulcher, Julie; Lasky, Jack; Clark, Shawn; Parry, Brent
Author Details:
Julie Fulcher, MSN, CNS-BC, CE, email: jmfulcher@geisinger.edu; Jack Lasky, EMT-P; Shawn Clark, DO, PhD; Brent Parry, BS, NREMT-P
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Simulation-based training is challenging to busy emergency departments (ED) and there staff. Scheduling training on a routine basis while meeting the needs of overcrowding and high turn-over can be quite challenging. While meeting the demands of education on high acuity care is a necessity. Design: This is a process improvement project to meet the increasing demands for education on high acuity patients in the ED. Simulation-based training was arranged and run unannounced to staff. When staff was alerted to room they would find a simulation manikin as their patient. Setting: Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center is a 274 bed hospital (including 20 rehabilitation beds at Geisinger-South Wilkes-Barre campus) in an urban area in northeast Pennsylvania. It is a Level II trauma and accredited chest pain center. The ED is a 32 room department with 54,000 visits per year and an admission rate of 18% for 2013. Participants: The ED staff at all levels participated in the simulations. The scenarios were designed and run by the educator, EMS coordinator, provider and periodically the trauma outreach coordinator. Methods: In busy EDs, staff has a difficult time leaving the unit to participate in education. They also have a difficult time coming in extra to attend simulations. In order to be progress in completing training, simulations were setup for staff to participate in without prior knowledge. This alleviated the anticipation and diversion from participating by staff when simulations are scheduled on the unit. Excuses staff made included that they are too busy with their other patients or want to get out on time. Simulations included the use of adult SIM man or SIM baby, cardiac monitoring and all equipment required for that scenario. Results: After a year and a half of routine simulations, the staff now request and look forward to simulation-based training. We run different scenarios each quarter including pregnant trauma and pediatric cases. Personnel which participated in the simulations included nurses, technicians, students, orientees, residents and providers. Implications: Education has its challenges. Simulation-based training allows for hands-on experience in a controlled environment. Planning un-announced simulations are an opportunity to mimic real life emergency situations. Opportunities for the future should include advancing these trainings on a routine basis and include all patient care staff from multiple disciplines. There are opportunities to include supportive areas like respiratory therapy, radiology, and surgery.
Keywords:
Simulation
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThere's a SIM in my Beden_GB
dc.contributor.authorFulcher, Julieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLasky, Jacken_GB
dc.contributor.authorClark, Shawnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParry, Brenten_GB
dc.author.detailsJulie Fulcher, MSN, CNS-BC, CE, email: jmfulcher@geisinger.edu; Jack Lasky, EMT-P; Shawn Clark, DO, PhD; Brent Parry, BS, NREMT-Pen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324170-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Simulation-based training is challenging to busy emergency departments (ED) and there staff. Scheduling training on a routine basis while meeting the needs of overcrowding and high turn-over can be quite challenging. While meeting the demands of education on high acuity care is a necessity. Design: This is a process improvement project to meet the increasing demands for education on high acuity patients in the ED. Simulation-based training was arranged and run unannounced to staff. When staff was alerted to room they would find a simulation manikin as their patient. Setting: Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center is a 274 bed hospital (including 20 rehabilitation beds at Geisinger-South Wilkes-Barre campus) in an urban area in northeast Pennsylvania. It is a Level II trauma and accredited chest pain center. The ED is a 32 room department with 54,000 visits per year and an admission rate of 18% for 2013. Participants: The ED staff at all levels participated in the simulations. The scenarios were designed and run by the educator, EMS coordinator, provider and periodically the trauma outreach coordinator. Methods: In busy EDs, staff has a difficult time leaving the unit to participate in education. They also have a difficult time coming in extra to attend simulations. In order to be progress in completing training, simulations were setup for staff to participate in without prior knowledge. This alleviated the anticipation and diversion from participating by staff when simulations are scheduled on the unit. Excuses staff made included that they are too busy with their other patients or want to get out on time. Simulations included the use of adult SIM man or SIM baby, cardiac monitoring and all equipment required for that scenario. Results: After a year and a half of routine simulations, the staff now request and look forward to simulation-based training. We run different scenarios each quarter including pregnant trauma and pediatric cases. Personnel which participated in the simulations included nurses, technicians, students, orientees, residents and providers. Implications: Education has its challenges. Simulation-based training allows for hands-on experience in a controlled environment. Planning un-announced simulations are an opportunity to mimic real life emergency situations. Opportunities for the future should include advancing these trainings on a routine basis and include all patient care staff from multiple disciplines. There are opportunities to include supportive areas like respiratory therapy, radiology, and surgery.en_GB
dc.subjectSimulationen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:46Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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