2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324174
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Clear, Concise Communication with Patients and Families
Author(s):
Damian, Frances J.; Schmid, Alexis; Hall, Jacqueline; Kline, Nancy E.
Author Details:
Frances J. Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BC, email: fran.damian@childrens.harvard.edu; Alexis Schmid, MS, RN, CPEN, CCRN, CPNP-PC; Jacqueline Hall, BSN, RN; Nancy E. Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Patient and family centeredness are critical to high quality care. In February 2013 the Emergency Department implemented a quality improvement initiative called the “3C Campaign,” (clear, concise communication), aimed at improving patient-centeredness in care delivery to promote provider-family interactions based on reported individual worries and expectations, and to create a culture of caring. Design: A self-report method is used to collect information from parents and patients. Setting: An urban tertiary care pediatric Emergency Department with 59,000 annual visits. The Emergency Department is a Level I trauma center with an admission rate of about 20%. Participants/Subjects: Parents of all patients presenting to the Emergency Department are given the opportunity to complete the 3C form. Written responses are voluntary. Adolescent patients may choose to complete the form instead of the parent. IRB approval was not required for this QI project. Methods: The 3C form is given to the parent or patient by the nurse or clinical assistant who brings them to the Emergency Department exam room from the triage area. A brief explanation of the form is offered. When completed, the nurse and physician caring for the patient are expected to review the information in order to establish an approach to the visit, addressing the parent or patient’s concerns. If the parent chooses not to complete the form, the nurse or physician are encouraged to include the questions as part of their assessment interview. The questions seek to identify the parent’s or patient’s worries, any questions they have about their child or the Emergency Department visit, and also their expectations for the visit (e.g., laboratory studies, diagnostic imaging, consultation with specialists). Results/Outcomes: Approximately 30% of parents/patients complete the 3C form. Preliminary data show an improvement in communication scores on an emergency department family satisfaction survey from 83.4% in March 2013 to 91.1% in May. Although early in the program, these data are encouraging and the results surpass the prior two years comparing the same 3 month period [March; 81.7% (2011), 83.9% (2012), 83.4% (2013): April; 75.2% (2011), 80.7% (2012), 82.1% (2013); May; 83.4% (2011), 83.1% (2012), 91.1% (2013)]. Content analysis is currently underway to more closely examine the parent/patient responses and identify common worries and questions based on chief complaint, and to identify information that potentially redirects clinical care and discharge teaching. Anecdotal information from staff indicates that the written responses are helpful in ensuring worries are addressed and needs and expectations are met. Families have expressed their feeling of “being cared for” by being asked to complete the form and having the care team address their concerns. Implications: Use of a standardized method to gain information on the child’s illness has potential value for delivering family centered care by identifying concerns and optimizing communication between providers and families. Additional information obtained from content analysis may give insight to common worries, questions and expectations during an emergency department visit.
Keywords:
Patient/Family Centeredness; 3C Campaign; Culture of Caring
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Clear, Concise Communication with Patients and Familiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDamian, Frances J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchmid, Alexisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Jacquelineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKline, Nancy E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsFrances J. Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BC, email: fran.damian@childrens.harvard.edu; Alexis Schmid, MS, RN, CPEN, CCRN, CPNP-PC; Jacqueline Hall, BSN, RN; Nancy E. Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAANen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324174-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Patient and family centeredness are critical to high quality care. In February 2013 the Emergency Department implemented a quality improvement initiative called the “3C Campaign,” (clear, concise communication), aimed at improving patient-centeredness in care delivery to promote provider-family interactions based on reported individual worries and expectations, and to create a culture of caring. Design: A self-report method is used to collect information from parents and patients. Setting: An urban tertiary care pediatric Emergency Department with 59,000 annual visits. The Emergency Department is a Level I trauma center with an admission rate of about 20%. Participants/Subjects: Parents of all patients presenting to the Emergency Department are given the opportunity to complete the 3C form. Written responses are voluntary. Adolescent patients may choose to complete the form instead of the parent. IRB approval was not required for this QI project. Methods: The 3C form is given to the parent or patient by the nurse or clinical assistant who brings them to the Emergency Department exam room from the triage area. A brief explanation of the form is offered. When completed, the nurse and physician caring for the patient are expected to review the information in order to establish an approach to the visit, addressing the parent or patient’s concerns. If the parent chooses not to complete the form, the nurse or physician are encouraged to include the questions as part of their assessment interview. The questions seek to identify the parent’s or patient’s worries, any questions they have about their child or the Emergency Department visit, and also their expectations for the visit (e.g., laboratory studies, diagnostic imaging, consultation with specialists). Results/Outcomes: Approximately 30% of parents/patients complete the 3C form. Preliminary data show an improvement in communication scores on an emergency department family satisfaction survey from 83.4% in March 2013 to 91.1% in May. Although early in the program, these data are encouraging and the results surpass the prior two years comparing the same 3 month period [March; 81.7% (2011), 83.9% (2012), 83.4% (2013): April; 75.2% (2011), 80.7% (2012), 82.1% (2013); May; 83.4% (2011), 83.1% (2012), 91.1% (2013)]. Content analysis is currently underway to more closely examine the parent/patient responses and identify common worries and questions based on chief complaint, and to identify information that potentially redirects clinical care and discharge teaching. Anecdotal information from staff indicates that the written responses are helpful in ensuring worries are addressed and needs and expectations are met. Families have expressed their feeling of “being cared for” by being asked to complete the form and having the care team address their concerns. Implications: Use of a standardized method to gain information on the child’s illness has potential value for delivering family centered care by identifying concerns and optimizing communication between providers and families. Additional information obtained from content analysis may give insight to common worries, questions and expectations during an emergency department visit.en_GB
dc.subjectPatient/Family Centerednessen_GB
dc.subject3C Campaignen_GB
dc.subjectCulture of Caringen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:50Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.