A Two-Way Street: Physician Perceptions of Factors in Effective Nurse-Physician Collaborative Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324175
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Two-Way Street: Physician Perceptions of Factors in Effective Nurse-Physician Collaborative Relationships
Author(s):
Lindberg, Kylie; Wolf, Lisa
Author Details:
Kylie Lindberg, MEd, BSN, email: klindberg@umass.edu; Lisa Wolf, PhD, RN, CEN, FAEN
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: Healthcare organizations strive to reduce cost with quality patient care and this can be achieved by minimizing medical errors and improving patient safety with the collaborative efforts of physicians and nurses. Having a functional, effective physician-nurse relationship has demonstrated reductions in medical errors/adverse events, length of hospital stay, and patient mortality. The purpose of this study is to discover physician perspectives on the challenges and facilitators in the physician-nurse relationship. Design: A qualitative exploratory design will be used for this research study. Setting: Interviews will be conducted at a location convenient for each participant, or via telephone. Participants/Subjects: Sample size will include 6-12 practicing acute care physicians, or until data saturation is reached. Inclusion criteria: over 18 years of age, physician, interacts with nurses regularly in a clinical setting, speaks English. Exclusion criteria includes physicians who do not interact with nurses; physicians not practicing in clinical settings; and physicians who do not speak or read English. Methods: One-on-one interviews with the researcher and participants of no longer than 60 minutes. Participants answer the following questions: 1) What were you taught about nursing in medical school and residency experiences? 2) Tell me about the relationship you have with the nurses in your area. 3) What makes you trust what a nurse tells you? Follow up questions will further explore this dynamic. Interviews will be audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes. Constant comparison will be employed to identify emerging themes. Transcripts will be reviewed by two researchers for theme development. Results/Outcomes: Preliminary exploratory data suggests that a nurse's experience plays a role in facilitating the physician-nurse relationship and communication. Physicians also identify that the length of their relationship with nurses promotes the trust that they have in those nurses. The ability of a nurse to articulate patient circumstances and to convey good clinical judgment also plays a role in facilitating physician-nurse communication. Implications: Preliminary findings suggest that clinical awareness and identification and articulation of patient problems are an important element in engaging physicians in effective collaborative relationships with nurses. Initial findings also suggest that physicians are not taught in their own training about nursing role, scope, and expertise, which may have an effect on perception of nursing epistemic authority around patient care. Joint training between medical and nursing students may be useful in developing effective nurse-physician relationships that benefit patient care models.
Keywords:
Nurse-Physician Collaborations
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Two-Way Street: Physician Perceptions of Factors in Effective Nurse-Physician Collaborative Relationshipsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLindberg, Kylieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Lisaen_GB
dc.author.detailsKylie Lindberg, MEd, BSN, email: klindberg@umass.edu; Lisa Wolf, PhD, RN, CEN, FAENen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324175-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: Healthcare organizations strive to reduce cost with quality patient care and this can be achieved by minimizing medical errors and improving patient safety with the collaborative efforts of physicians and nurses. Having a functional, effective physician-nurse relationship has demonstrated reductions in medical errors/adverse events, length of hospital stay, and patient mortality. The purpose of this study is to discover physician perspectives on the challenges and facilitators in the physician-nurse relationship. Design: A qualitative exploratory design will be used for this research study. Setting: Interviews will be conducted at a location convenient for each participant, or via telephone. Participants/Subjects: Sample size will include 6-12 practicing acute care physicians, or until data saturation is reached. Inclusion criteria: over 18 years of age, physician, interacts with nurses regularly in a clinical setting, speaks English. Exclusion criteria includes physicians who do not interact with nurses; physicians not practicing in clinical settings; and physicians who do not speak or read English. Methods: One-on-one interviews with the researcher and participants of no longer than 60 minutes. Participants answer the following questions: 1) What were you taught about nursing in medical school and residency experiences? 2) Tell me about the relationship you have with the nurses in your area. 3) What makes you trust what a nurse tells you? Follow up questions will further explore this dynamic. Interviews will be audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes. Constant comparison will be employed to identify emerging themes. Transcripts will be reviewed by two researchers for theme development. Results/Outcomes: Preliminary exploratory data suggests that a nurse's experience plays a role in facilitating the physician-nurse relationship and communication. Physicians also identify that the length of their relationship with nurses promotes the trust that they have in those nurses. The ability of a nurse to articulate patient circumstances and to convey good clinical judgment also plays a role in facilitating physician-nurse communication. Implications: Preliminary findings suggest that clinical awareness and identification and articulation of patient problems are an important element in engaging physicians in effective collaborative relationships with nurses. Initial findings also suggest that physicians are not taught in their own training about nursing role, scope, and expertise, which may have an effect on perception of nursing epistemic authority around patient care. Joint training between medical and nursing students may be useful in developing effective nurse-physician relationships that benefit patient care models.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse-Physician Collaborationsen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:51Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:51Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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