2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324176
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fostering Nursing Role Transition: Utilizing Elective Emergency Courses
Author(s):
Slone, Cindy
Author Details:
Cindy Slone, EdD, RN, CEN, email: cindyslone@creighton.edu
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: Although clinical competence and role acquisition were unspoken yet mutually agreed upon goals between the nursing faculty and the undergraduate nurse, ultimately, assuming the nursing role has not always been a rewarding and seamless process for the graduate nurse. Does receiving the graduation diploma and passing the board exam make role transition from student to practitioner possible? This research sought to better understand undergraduate education’s contribution to the smooth transition into nursing practice. By reducing the educational gap between undergraduate education and the orientation program provided by the employer, it is anticipated that reorientation costs would be reduced by preparing the new graduate to assume their professional role successfully on their first attempt. Employers would be highly interested in the reduced costs associated with job satisfaction and retention among new graduates. Design: A phenomenological, qualitative study was conducted by interviewing 11 graduate nurses who had enrolled in an undergraduate clinical course focused in emergency nursing. The study was conducted to ascertain their lived experiences following graduation and the perception of the graduate’s transition into nursing practice. Setting: A small Midwestern college associated with a teaching urban Level II trauma center utilized senior nursing clinical elective courses to bridge the educational gap between the student role and the professional role. Participants/Subjects: The following inclusion criteria were used to select the participants that would be interviewed. Participants were graduates who had obtained a bachelor of science in nursing and had graduated from the above college. Participants had previously enrolled in a clinical nursing elective course in emergency nursing as an undergraduate and have since been employed as a nurse for a minimum of six months following graduation. Institutional Review Board approval was sought and obtained from the institution of higher education where the researcher was enrolled as a doctoral student. Methods: This study involved face-to-face interviews that lasted approximately 45-60 minutes. Data was analyzed and themes were identified using Nvivo9 computer software. Results/Outcomes: Participants identified that skill repetition, practice in prioritization, exposure to death and dying experiences and networking with nurses better prepared the student for role transition into emergency nursing. Graduates valued the ability to electively choose a nursing specialty area and the exposure to the emergency environment (multiple diseases, multiple cultures, all age groups) prior to applying for their first employment regardless of the nursing area in which they were later employed. Implications: By interacting with assigned and supportive nurse preceptors, the student nurse developed an increased sense of proficiency and confidence prior to graduation that the graduate nurse perceived assisted them in smoothly transitioning into their professional role. The participants perceived that they were able to assume their professional role. Graduates defined success by noting the comments in their annual evaluations. This research provides evidence to guide nursing educators in designing curricula that prepares graduates who can more effectively transition into their first nursing role. This research has implications for employers who wish to reduce orientation costs and retain graduates.
Keywords:
Nursing Role Transition
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFostering Nursing Role Transition: Utilizing Elective Emergency Coursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSlone, Cindyen_GB
dc.author.detailsCindy Slone, EdD, RN, CEN, email: cindyslone@creighton.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324176-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: Although clinical competence and role acquisition were unspoken yet mutually agreed upon goals between the nursing faculty and the undergraduate nurse, ultimately, assuming the nursing role has not always been a rewarding and seamless process for the graduate nurse. Does receiving the graduation diploma and passing the board exam make role transition from student to practitioner possible? This research sought to better understand undergraduate education’s contribution to the smooth transition into nursing practice. By reducing the educational gap between undergraduate education and the orientation program provided by the employer, it is anticipated that reorientation costs would be reduced by preparing the new graduate to assume their professional role successfully on their first attempt. Employers would be highly interested in the reduced costs associated with job satisfaction and retention among new graduates. Design: A phenomenological, qualitative study was conducted by interviewing 11 graduate nurses who had enrolled in an undergraduate clinical course focused in emergency nursing. The study was conducted to ascertain their lived experiences following graduation and the perception of the graduate’s transition into nursing practice. Setting: A small Midwestern college associated with a teaching urban Level II trauma center utilized senior nursing clinical elective courses to bridge the educational gap between the student role and the professional role. Participants/Subjects: The following inclusion criteria were used to select the participants that would be interviewed. Participants were graduates who had obtained a bachelor of science in nursing and had graduated from the above college. Participants had previously enrolled in a clinical nursing elective course in emergency nursing as an undergraduate and have since been employed as a nurse for a minimum of six months following graduation. Institutional Review Board approval was sought and obtained from the institution of higher education where the researcher was enrolled as a doctoral student. Methods: This study involved face-to-face interviews that lasted approximately 45-60 minutes. Data was analyzed and themes were identified using Nvivo9 computer software. Results/Outcomes: Participants identified that skill repetition, practice in prioritization, exposure to death and dying experiences and networking with nurses better prepared the student for role transition into emergency nursing. Graduates valued the ability to electively choose a nursing specialty area and the exposure to the emergency environment (multiple diseases, multiple cultures, all age groups) prior to applying for their first employment regardless of the nursing area in which they were later employed. Implications: By interacting with assigned and supportive nurse preceptors, the student nurse developed an increased sense of proficiency and confidence prior to graduation that the graduate nurse perceived assisted them in smoothly transitioning into their professional role. The participants perceived that they were able to assume their professional role. Graduates defined success by noting the comments in their annual evaluations. This research provides evidence to guide nursing educators in designing curricula that prepares graduates who can more effectively transition into their first nursing role. This research has implications for employers who wish to reduce orientation costs and retain graduates.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Role Transitionen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:52Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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