2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324178
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Staff Perceptions of Communication and Teamwork in the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Hall, Jacqueline; Connor, Jean Anne; Mott, Sandra; Damian, Frances
Author Details:
Jacqueline Hall, BSN, RN, email: jacqueline.hall@childrens.harvard.edu; Jean Anne Connor, DNS, RN, CPNP; Sandra Mott, PhD, RN-BC, CPN; Frances Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BC
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: The Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) is fast-paced, most patients are complex, and staff must deal with constraints and interruptions while providing care. The structure and geography of this Emergency Department (ED) challenges effective communication and teamwork. The purpose of this project was to learn staff’s perceptions of the current state of the environment and their suggestions for ways to optimize communication and facilitate teamwork. Design: An improvement science project using survey method to gather data from physicians and nurses in the ED. Setting: A Northeast level I pediatric trauma center in an academic free-standing children’s hospital with 59,000 visits annually. Participants/Subjects: All ED nurses (83) and the second/third year fellows and attending physicians (60) for combined total of 143 from which 85 anonymous surveys were returned. Methods: Nurses and physicians received the 18-question electronic survey. Participants responded to statements on a 4-point Likert scale (strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree) with a space for comments, 6 statements of open response and 4 which required rating on a scale of 1=poor to 5=excellent. Nurses and doctors were asked to evaluate aspects of teamwork and communication within their own disciplines and across disciplines, to identify barriers to effective communication/teamwork, and to provide suggestions for improving teamwork in the ED. Results/Outcomes: A total of 85 (~60%) responses were received, 40 (66%) from physicians and 45 (54%) from nurses. Overall survey responses were similar among groups. They were comfortable asking questions or seeking assistance from peers within their discipline. The mean rating physicians gave for within discipline communication was 4.49 and for teamwork 4.43. Similarly, the mean rating nurses gave was 4.14 and 4.20 respectively. Physicians rated cross discipline communication as 3.71 and teamwork 4.13 while nurses rated them slightly lower with means of 2.98 and 3.26. Both physicians and nurses agreed they were comfortable interacting with each other regarding their assigned patients and generally felt that their concerns were taken seriously. There was considerable variability in their response to adequate face-to-face time; however, the majority agreed it was adequate. When asked if one discipline has a good understanding of the other’s workload, the response was split between agree and disagree. Everyone agreed teamwork was crucial and typically defined it as a group of people working together toward a common goal. Barriers to communication were identified as the fast paced environment, heavy workloads, the phone system, and lack of structured nurse-physician teams. Poor communication was perceived to result in delays in patient care, mistakes, and a decline in staff and family satisfaction. Common responses for improving teamwork in the ED included alignment of physician and nurse teams, integrate huddles throughout the shift, and improve the phone system. Implications: Based on the survey responses, a system change is indicated; such as a physician-nurse structured team caring for a specific grouping of patients will facilitate teamwork and effective communication. Better communication will streamline care, thereby increasing patient and family satisfaction and decreasing length of stay in the ED.
Keywords:
Coommunication and Teamwork in the ED
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStaff Perceptions of Communication and Teamwork in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Jacquelineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Jean Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMott, Sandraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDamian, Francesen_GB
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Hall, BSN, RN, email: jacqueline.hall@childrens.harvard.edu; Jean Anne Connor, DNS, RN, CPNP; Sandra Mott, PhD, RN-BC, CPN; Frances Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BCen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324178-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: The Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) is fast-paced, most patients are complex, and staff must deal with constraints and interruptions while providing care. The structure and geography of this Emergency Department (ED) challenges effective communication and teamwork. The purpose of this project was to learn staff’s perceptions of the current state of the environment and their suggestions for ways to optimize communication and facilitate teamwork. Design: An improvement science project using survey method to gather data from physicians and nurses in the ED. Setting: A Northeast level I pediatric trauma center in an academic free-standing children’s hospital with 59,000 visits annually. Participants/Subjects: All ED nurses (83) and the second/third year fellows and attending physicians (60) for combined total of 143 from which 85 anonymous surveys were returned. Methods: Nurses and physicians received the 18-question electronic survey. Participants responded to statements on a 4-point Likert scale (strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree) with a space for comments, 6 statements of open response and 4 which required rating on a scale of 1=poor to 5=excellent. Nurses and doctors were asked to evaluate aspects of teamwork and communication within their own disciplines and across disciplines, to identify barriers to effective communication/teamwork, and to provide suggestions for improving teamwork in the ED. Results/Outcomes: A total of 85 (~60%) responses were received, 40 (66%) from physicians and 45 (54%) from nurses. Overall survey responses were similar among groups. They were comfortable asking questions or seeking assistance from peers within their discipline. The mean rating physicians gave for within discipline communication was 4.49 and for teamwork 4.43. Similarly, the mean rating nurses gave was 4.14 and 4.20 respectively. Physicians rated cross discipline communication as 3.71 and teamwork 4.13 while nurses rated them slightly lower with means of 2.98 and 3.26. Both physicians and nurses agreed they were comfortable interacting with each other regarding their assigned patients and generally felt that their concerns were taken seriously. There was considerable variability in their response to adequate face-to-face time; however, the majority agreed it was adequate. When asked if one discipline has a good understanding of the other’s workload, the response was split between agree and disagree. Everyone agreed teamwork was crucial and typically defined it as a group of people working together toward a common goal. Barriers to communication were identified as the fast paced environment, heavy workloads, the phone system, and lack of structured nurse-physician teams. Poor communication was perceived to result in delays in patient care, mistakes, and a decline in staff and family satisfaction. Common responses for improving teamwork in the ED included alignment of physician and nurse teams, integrate huddles throughout the shift, and improve the phone system. Implications: Based on the survey responses, a system change is indicated; such as a physician-nurse structured team caring for a specific grouping of patients will facilitate teamwork and effective communication. Better communication will streamline care, thereby increasing patient and family satisfaction and decreasing length of stay in the ED.en_GB
dc.subjectCoommunication and Teamwork in the EDen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:53Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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