2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324179
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Optimizing Transfer of Care from the Emergency Department
Author(s):
Naughton, Jennifer; Connor, Jean Anne; Mott, Sandra; Damian, Frances
Author Details:
Jennifer Naughton, BSN, RN, email: jennifer.naughton@childrens.harvard.edu; Jean Anne Connor, DNS, RN, CPNP; Sandra Mott, PhD, RN-BC, CPN; Frances Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BC
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: To learn from the pediatric nursing staff in both the emergency department (ED) and inpatient units their perceptions of each other’s roles and responsibilities during transfer of care. Historically admitting patients from the ED to the inpatient units has been a challenging experience with issues and concerns verbalized by nursing staff at both locations. There is a paucity of literature beyond basic descriptions of the situation. Therefore before introducing an intervention, it was important to learn from the two nursing staffs their perceptions of the major issues and why transfer of care is so problematic. Design: An improvement science project using focus groups as data source. Setting: A free standing academic quaternary children’s hospital in the Northeast. The level one trauma center ED has ~59,000 visits yearly; of these visits 20% (~12,000) are admitted to the inpatient units. Participants/Subjects: The population included all nurses in the ED and in representative inpatient units. Participants were recruited through email communications that invited them to share their experiences with transfer of care during one of several focus groups. In addition there were overhead verbal invitations at the time of the focus groups. The sample consisted of nurses who were able and who wanted to participate. Methods: A single nurse scientist who had no supervisory role with any of the nurses conducted the focus groups with nurses from the ED and from the inpatient units. A variety of times and days were used so all staff had an opportunity to participate. The same five open-ended questions focusing on experience and perceptions of concerns/issues during transfer of care were asked at each focus group. The comments shared by the nurses were audio taped and transcribed verbatim without any identifiable information. Data was analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results/Outcomes: Project is still in process; although saturation of data has occurred for the ED it has not yet occurred for the inpatient setting. A preliminary review of the data indicates that a dominant issue is that neither ED nor inpatient nurses understand how each other functions. There is tremendous variation in what nurses would like to have happen around transfer of care. Both ED and inpatient nurses perceive the other as looking to decrease their workload at the expense of the other. However, most state that the process is improving and there are not as many issues as in the past. Implications: The opportunity exists to improve the transfer of care process for the patient/family and the nurses, to improve satisfaction for all involved, to improve patient safety, and to decrease the ED length of stay. The project provides an opportunity for staff nurses to share their concerns and offer suggestions for innovations, such as a mechanism for each staff to learn the other’s workflow, that will improve patient/family centered care. Since change is always easier if those involved are invested in the process, nurses from both the ED and inpatient unit will be asked to participate in creating these innovations.
Keywords:
Transfer of Care from ED
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOptimizing Transfer of Care from the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorNaughton, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Jean Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMott, Sandraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDamian, Francesen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Naughton, BSN, RN, email: jennifer.naughton@childrens.harvard.edu; Jean Anne Connor, DNS, RN, CPNP; Sandra Mott, PhD, RN-BC, CPN; Frances Damian, MS, RN, NEA-BCen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324179-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: To learn from the pediatric nursing staff in both the emergency department (ED) and inpatient units their perceptions of each other’s roles and responsibilities during transfer of care. Historically admitting patients from the ED to the inpatient units has been a challenging experience with issues and concerns verbalized by nursing staff at both locations. There is a paucity of literature beyond basic descriptions of the situation. Therefore before introducing an intervention, it was important to learn from the two nursing staffs their perceptions of the major issues and why transfer of care is so problematic. Design: An improvement science project using focus groups as data source. Setting: A free standing academic quaternary children’s hospital in the Northeast. The level one trauma center ED has ~59,000 visits yearly; of these visits 20% (~12,000) are admitted to the inpatient units. Participants/Subjects: The population included all nurses in the ED and in representative inpatient units. Participants were recruited through email communications that invited them to share their experiences with transfer of care during one of several focus groups. In addition there were overhead verbal invitations at the time of the focus groups. The sample consisted of nurses who were able and who wanted to participate. Methods: A single nurse scientist who had no supervisory role with any of the nurses conducted the focus groups with nurses from the ED and from the inpatient units. A variety of times and days were used so all staff had an opportunity to participate. The same five open-ended questions focusing on experience and perceptions of concerns/issues during transfer of care were asked at each focus group. The comments shared by the nurses were audio taped and transcribed verbatim without any identifiable information. Data was analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results/Outcomes: Project is still in process; although saturation of data has occurred for the ED it has not yet occurred for the inpatient setting. A preliminary review of the data indicates that a dominant issue is that neither ED nor inpatient nurses understand how each other functions. There is tremendous variation in what nurses would like to have happen around transfer of care. Both ED and inpatient nurses perceive the other as looking to decrease their workload at the expense of the other. However, most state that the process is improving and there are not as many issues as in the past. Implications: The opportunity exists to improve the transfer of care process for the patient/family and the nurses, to improve satisfaction for all involved, to improve patient safety, and to decrease the ED length of stay. The project provides an opportunity for staff nurses to share their concerns and offer suggestions for innovations, such as a mechanism for each staff to learn the other’s workflow, that will improve patient/family centered care. Since change is always easier if those involved are invested in the process, nurses from both the ED and inpatient unit will be asked to participate in creating these innovations.en_GB
dc.subjectTransfer of Care from EDen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:54Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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