2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324180
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Nursing: How prepared are You?
Author(s):
Zeller, Stefanie E.
Author Details:
Stefanie E. Zeller, MSN, RN, email: szeller@pinnaclehealth.org
Abstract:
Research Abstract Purpose: Current disaster knowledge, preparedness, and management training needs to be evaluated to guide plans for effective educational programs. Literature has identified multiple methods of disaster preparedness training. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet discovered the most effective method for training hospital personal. The purpose of this study was to identify how emergency nurses perceive their training, identify which method of training was preferred, and to assess nurses’ perceptions of whether or not they felt there was a high likelihood of a disaster occurring that affects their hospital. Design: A qualitative design, with an underpinning of a constructivist, grounded theory approach was utilized for this research study. Setting: Research was conducted at a Central Pennsylvania Emergency Department. This urban hospital is settled in the state capital, and treats more than 65,000 emergency patients annually. Participants: A purposeful sample of 10 participants was used. The only exclusion criterion for this study was that participants had to have more than 5 years of emergency nursing experience. Methods: 1:1 semi-structured interviews using observation of participants in their natural setting were utilized for data collection.. Questions were investigator constructed. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Notes were taken during the interview process and a reflective journal was also used as an audit trial. The interview responses were broken down into subcategories to identify any emergence of common responses and themes, using a coding schematic. Data was coded on a macro level initially to compare responses. Descriptive coding was then used to label data and divide into various categories until themes emerged. Results: Two significant themes emerged from data collection. 6 out of 10 emergency nurses perceived their preparation as somewhat or relatively prepared. The remainder of the participants verbalized that they were not prepared at all. Secondly, nurses felt the most effective method of enhancing the perception of disaster preparedness would be through practice, utilizing large scale disaster drills. Nurses overwhelming felt that hands on training superseded classroom, instructional education. Interestingly, nurses also felt that their ability to deal with “controlled chaos” in the emergency department on a day to day basis prepared them for the ability to deal with a disaster. Other comments including having a “robust staff”, “well versed and well educated” nurses and the “ability to stay calm and competent” during disasters, all set ED nurses apart from the rest in the ability to lead and manage disasters. Implications: Implications for practice include increasing the number of system wide disaster drills. Including a disaster training component into charge nurse workshops. Organizing and implementing a disaster preparedness committee, would also increase departmental knowledge and increase the number of resources available to educate and support staff in the presence of a disaster. Another implication for practice is the assessment of current intranet disaster preparedness information, because it is essential to have quick and easy access to policies and procedures. Finally, the inclusion of frontline healthcare workers on organizational decisions made in relation to current or future disaster management strategies would be critical.
Keywords:
Disaster Preparedness
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisaster Preparedness and Emergency Nursing: How prepared are You?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZeller, Stefanie E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsStefanie E. Zeller, MSN, RN, email: szeller@pinnaclehealth.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324180-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract Purpose: Current disaster knowledge, preparedness, and management training needs to be evaluated to guide plans for effective educational programs. Literature has identified multiple methods of disaster preparedness training. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet discovered the most effective method for training hospital personal. The purpose of this study was to identify how emergency nurses perceive their training, identify which method of training was preferred, and to assess nurses’ perceptions of whether or not they felt there was a high likelihood of a disaster occurring that affects their hospital. Design: A qualitative design, with an underpinning of a constructivist, grounded theory approach was utilized for this research study. Setting: Research was conducted at a Central Pennsylvania Emergency Department. This urban hospital is settled in the state capital, and treats more than 65,000 emergency patients annually. Participants: A purposeful sample of 10 participants was used. The only exclusion criterion for this study was that participants had to have more than 5 years of emergency nursing experience. Methods: 1:1 semi-structured interviews using observation of participants in their natural setting were utilized for data collection.. Questions were investigator constructed. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Notes were taken during the interview process and a reflective journal was also used as an audit trial. The interview responses were broken down into subcategories to identify any emergence of common responses and themes, using a coding schematic. Data was coded on a macro level initially to compare responses. Descriptive coding was then used to label data and divide into various categories until themes emerged. Results: Two significant themes emerged from data collection. 6 out of 10 emergency nurses perceived their preparation as somewhat or relatively prepared. The remainder of the participants verbalized that they were not prepared at all. Secondly, nurses felt the most effective method of enhancing the perception of disaster preparedness would be through practice, utilizing large scale disaster drills. Nurses overwhelming felt that hands on training superseded classroom, instructional education. Interestingly, nurses also felt that their ability to deal with “controlled chaos” in the emergency department on a day to day basis prepared them for the ability to deal with a disaster. Other comments including having a “robust staff”, “well versed and well educated” nurses and the “ability to stay calm and competent” during disasters, all set ED nurses apart from the rest in the ability to lead and manage disasters. Implications: Implications for practice include increasing the number of system wide disaster drills. Including a disaster training component into charge nurse workshops. Organizing and implementing a disaster preparedness committee, would also increase departmental knowledge and increase the number of resources available to educate and support staff in the presence of a disaster. Another implication for practice is the assessment of current intranet disaster preparedness information, because it is essential to have quick and easy access to policies and procedures. Finally, the inclusion of frontline healthcare workers on organizational decisions made in relation to current or future disaster management strategies would be critical.en_GB
dc.subjectDisaster Preparednessen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:56Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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