Comparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324855
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Comparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patients
Author(s):
Franklin, Ashley; Sideras, Stephanie; Gubrud-Howe, Paula Marie; Lee, Christopher
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Psi
Author Details:
Ashley Franklin, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE, CHSE, email Afranklin07@gmail.com; Stephanie Sideras, PhD, RN, Paula Gubrud-Howe, EdD, RN, FAAN, Christopher Lee, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN
Abstract:

Background:  Because of the complex needs of hospitalized patients today, nurses’ competence and strategies to improve competence are of growing importance. Simulation is one way nursing education addresses the development of competence, but little evidence exists for comparing how pre-simulation assignments further influence competence. It is generally accepted that simulation is effective at increasing novice nurses’ competence for providing care to one patient, but how simulation with multiple patients impacts novice nurses’ competence remains unknown.

Methods:  A randomized control trial was used to compare the efficacy of three simulation preparation methods (expert modeling/intervention, voice over PowerPoint/active control, and reading assignments/passive control) on improving competence for providing care to multiple patients among senior undergraduate novice nurses. Competence was measured at two time points (baseline and following a five week intervention) by two blinded reviewers using the Creighton Simulation Evaluation Instrument™.

Results:  Twenty novice nurses participated in the trial. There were no significant differences in the raw improvements in competence among the three groups; but, the expert modeling (Cohen’s d = 0.413) and voice over PowerPoint methods (Cohen’s d = 0.226) resulted in greater improvements in competence compared with the passive control.

Conclusions:  This trial provides a foundation of evidence for using expert modeling and voice over PowerPoint as simulation preparation to increase novice nurses’ competence in new, complex simulation scenarios and future trials.

Keywords:
baccalaureate nursing education; clinical competence; patient simulation
MeSH:
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Clinical Competence
CINAHL Headings:
Simulations
Repository Posting Date:
15-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
2014
Citation:
Franklin, A., Sideras, S., Gubrud-Howe, P., & Lee, S. (in press). Comparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patients. Journal of Nursing Education.
Publisher:
SLACK
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning, 2014 Learning Resource Conference
Conference Host:
International Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning
Conference Location:
Orlando, FL, USA
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau Intenational
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.; The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelRandomized Controlled Trialen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleComparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patientsen
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Ashleyen
dc.contributor.authorSideras, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorGubrud-Howe, Paula Marieen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Christopheren
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Psien
dc.author.detailsAshley Franklin, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE, CHSE, email Afranklin07@gmail.com; Stephanie Sideras, PhD, RN, Paula Gubrud-Howe, EdD, RN, FAAN, Christopher Lee, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAANen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324855en
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background:</strong>  Because of the complex needs of hospitalized patients today, nurses’ competence and strategies to improve competence are of growing importance. Simulation is one way nursing education addresses the development of competence, but little evidence exists for comparing how pre-simulation assignments further influence competence. It is generally accepted that simulation is effective at increasing novice nurses’ competence for providing care to one patient, but how simulation with multiple patients impacts novice nurses’ competence remains unknown.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> A randomized control trial was used to compare the efficacy of three simulation preparation methods (expert modeling/intervention, voice over PowerPoint/active control, and reading assignments/passive control) on improving competence for providing care to multiple patients among senior undergraduate novice nurses. Competence was measured at two time points (baseline and following a five week intervention) by two blinded reviewers using the Creighton Simulation Evaluation Instrument™.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong>  Twenty novice nurses participated in the trial. There were no significant differences in the raw improvements in competence among the three groups; but, the expert modeling (Cohen’s <em>d </em>= 0.413) and voice over PowerPoint methods (Cohen’s <em>d </em>= 0.226) resulted in greater improvements in competence compared with the passive control.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions:</strong>  This trial provides a foundation of evidence for using expert modeling and voice over PowerPoint as simulation preparation to increase novice nurses’ competence in new, complex simulation scenarios and future trials.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectbaccalaureate nursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectclinical competenceen_GB
dc.subjectpatient simulationen_GB
dc.subject.meshEducation, Nursing, Baccalaureateen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subject.cinahlSimulationsen
dc.date.available2014-08-15T19:27:57Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T19:27:57Zen
dc.identifier.citationFranklin, A., Sideras, S., Gubrud-Howe, P., & Lee, S. (in press). Comparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patients. Journal of Nursing Education.en_GB
dc.publisherSLACKen_GB
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameInternational Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning, 2014 Learning Resource Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostInternational Association for Clinical Simulation and Learningen_GB
dc.conference.locationOrlando, FL, USAen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Intenationalen_GB
dc.identifier.citationFranklin, A., Sideras, S., Gubrud-Howe, P., & Lee, S. (in press). Comparison of Expert Modeling Versus Voice-Over PowerPoint and Pre-Simulation Readings on Novice Nurses' Competence for Providing Care to Multiple Patients. Journal of Nursing Education.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
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