2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335041
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating Nursing Students as Change Agents: A Case Study
Other Titles:
Preparing Students as Catalysts for Change
Author(s):
Friese, Tanya R.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Phi
Author Details:
Tanya R. Friese, BS, BSN, MSN, tanya_r_friese@rush.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: In 1996, the Institute of Medicine Committee on Public Health proposed a model of engagement and collaboration of public health, community, and hospital partnerships to improve population health. Nearly seventeen years later, supported by aspects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), this initiative requires a nursing workforce with leadership capabilities to transcend boundaries between the two sectors. At our college of nursing, faculty who teach public and community health nursing collaborate with the university medical center and community based organizations to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning who are patient advocates and innovators capable of problem-solving and development and implementation of changes that improve outcomes in complex health care systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Leadership as a framework, students at Rush University College of Nursing (part of a large academic medical center with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice) are educated as change agents. Students to work with community partners, conduct a community assessment, identify areas of need, and gather data to support and evaluate the changes. Faculty coached students lead the needed changes, integrating coursework including organizational leadership, health care policy, epidemiology, biostatistics, and finance with project experiences. A case-study of using this model for education in leadership is nursing student involvement (with faculty guidance) in ongoing efforts at the medical center to improve the care of patients with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. The experience provides real-life lessons in leadership to strengthen care coordination between regulatory agencies, family, and community supports and to bridge the gap between inpatient care and public health to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.
Keywords:
community partnerships; leadership; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14B12
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEducating Nursing Students as Change Agents: A Case Studyen
dc.title.alternativePreparing Students as Catalysts for Changeen
dc.contributor.authorFriese, Tanya R.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Phien
dc.author.detailsTanya R. Friese, BS, BSN, MSN, tanya_r_friese@rush.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335041-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: In 1996, the Institute of Medicine Committee on Public Health proposed a model of engagement and collaboration of public health, community, and hospital partnerships to improve population health. Nearly seventeen years later, supported by aspects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), this initiative requires a nursing workforce with leadership capabilities to transcend boundaries between the two sectors. At our college of nursing, faculty who teach public and community health nursing collaborate with the university medical center and community based organizations to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning who are patient advocates and innovators capable of problem-solving and development and implementation of changes that improve outcomes in complex health care systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Leadership as a framework, students at Rush University College of Nursing (part of a large academic medical center with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice) are educated as change agents. Students to work with community partners, conduct a community assessment, identify areas of need, and gather data to support and evaluate the changes. Faculty coached students lead the needed changes, integrating coursework including organizational leadership, health care policy, epidemiology, biostatistics, and finance with project experiences. A case-study of using this model for education in leadership is nursing student involvement (with faculty guidance) in ongoing efforts at the medical center to improve the care of patients with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. The experience provides real-life lessons in leadership to strengthen care coordination between regulatory agencies, family, and community supports and to bridge the gap between inpatient care and public health to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.en
dc.subjectcommunity partnershipsen
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:42:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:42:41Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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