2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335049
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Come In...The Water's Warm: A New Nurse's Induction to a Hostile Environment
Other Titles:
Incivility in Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Hickson, Josiane
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Josiane Hickson, BSN, MA, EdD, RN, NE-BC, jh2647@tc.columbia.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: The success for the future of the nursing profession has relied upon the cultivation, assimilation, professionalism, and satisfaction of newly licensed Registered Nurses (RNs). This presentation was prompted by the descriptive study which investigated the perceptions of nursing hostility and job satisfaction of new graduate nurses with less than three years of experience (N = 1,165), comparing the working settings of Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. An online survey was conducted using the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (Einarsen, Hoel, & Notelaers, 2009), the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Survey (Mueller & McCloskey, 1990), the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey (Casey, Fink, Krugman, & Propst, 2004), and a demographic questionnaire, through an advertisement on Facebook which targeted individuals based on the specifications of this study's focus. Findings indicated that RNs of Magnet and non-Magnet facilities had similar hostility and job satisfaction results. Magnet nurses (n = 226) perceived nursing hostility significantly different than non-Magnet nurses (n = 939); however, both groups reported a global perception of nursing hostility as new graduate nurses. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference (p < .001) indicating higher job satisfaction among Magnet RNs. Furthermore, perceptions of comfort, confidence, and support revealed marginal differences between both groups (p < .05), though these attributes of satisfaction were higher among Magnet nurses. Results indicated that RNs of Magnet facilities (48%) and non-Magnet facilities (49%) were classified as victims of bullying. More than 70% of Magnet and non-Magnet RNs identified their level of job satisfaction as moderately dissatisfied to very dissatisfied. More than 80% of RNs from both groups perceived a lack of comfort, confidence, and support in their current job. The theory of oppression provided a model for understanding the dynamics and the effects of nursing hostility and job satisfaction of newly RNs. Based on this study's findings, greater consideration should be placed on: orientation/residency programs, collaborative partnerships between academia and service, zero-tolerance for behaviors that undermine a culture of safety, and addressing nursing hostility.
Keywords:
Newly graduated nurses; Bullying; Nursing Hostility
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14C14
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCome In...The Water's Warm: A New Nurse's Induction to a Hostile Environmenten
dc.title.alternativeIncivility in Nursing Practiceen
dc.contributor.authorHickson, Josianeen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJosiane Hickson, BSN, MA, EdD, RN, NE-BC, jh2647@tc.columbia.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335049-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: The success for the future of the nursing profession has relied upon the cultivation, assimilation, professionalism, and satisfaction of newly licensed Registered Nurses (RNs). This presentation was prompted by the descriptive study which investigated the perceptions of nursing hostility and job satisfaction of new graduate nurses with less than three years of experience (N = 1,165), comparing the working settings of Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. An online survey was conducted using the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (Einarsen, Hoel, & Notelaers, 2009), the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Survey (Mueller & McCloskey, 1990), the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey (Casey, Fink, Krugman, & Propst, 2004), and a demographic questionnaire, through an advertisement on Facebook which targeted individuals based on the specifications of this study's focus. Findings indicated that RNs of Magnet and non-Magnet facilities had similar hostility and job satisfaction results. Magnet nurses (n = 226) perceived nursing hostility significantly different than non-Magnet nurses (n = 939); however, both groups reported a global perception of nursing hostility as new graduate nurses. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference (p < .001) indicating higher job satisfaction among Magnet RNs. Furthermore, perceptions of comfort, confidence, and support revealed marginal differences between both groups (p < .05), though these attributes of satisfaction were higher among Magnet nurses. Results indicated that RNs of Magnet facilities (48%) and non-Magnet facilities (49%) were classified as victims of bullying. More than 70% of Magnet and non-Magnet RNs identified their level of job satisfaction as moderately dissatisfied to very dissatisfied. More than 80% of RNs from both groups perceived a lack of comfort, confidence, and support in their current job. The theory of oppression provided a model for understanding the dynamics and the effects of nursing hostility and job satisfaction of newly RNs. Based on this study's findings, greater consideration should be placed on: orientation/residency programs, collaborative partnerships between academia and service, zero-tolerance for behaviors that undermine a culture of safety, and addressing nursing hostility.en
dc.subjectNewly graduated nursesen
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectNursing Hostilityen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:42:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:42:53Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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