21.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335108
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Robotic Pets as Companions for Socially Isolated Older Adults
Other Titles:
Health Promotion Strategies in the Older Population
Author(s):
Edwards, Nancy E.; Beck, Alan M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Omicron
Author Details:
Nancy E. Edwards, PhD, MS, ANP-BC, edwardsn@purdue.edu; Alan M. Beck, ScD
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: Robotic animals have been used in a variety of ways with older adults. Robotic animals have been used in a service function as assistive or physical aides and as an entertainment or companion role. Human interactive robots for entertainment and companionship are increasing in interest and research applications. This projects examined the influence of a 6 week interaction with a robotic dog (AIBO) on depressive symptoms, morale and life satisfaction in socially isolated older adults. Methods: Fifteen older adults interacted with AIBO in their room in an assisted living facility for 6 weeks. The individuals kept the dog in their home for the duration of the study. The individuals lived alone, were over 65 years, had a MMSE over 23 and did not have a pet. Baseline data on morale, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction was obtained. Two weeks later AIBO, a robotic dog, was introduced and allowed to stay with the individual for 6 weeks (Week 8). Participants were invited to interact with AIBO as often as they liked and could do whatever activities they chose. Data collection was completed at the completion of the study. Video recordings of the adult/AIBO interactions were obtained at week 2, week 5 and at week 8 when AIBO was removed. Results: The sample included 13 female and 2 males with a mean age of 84. The majority were Caucasian. The participants reported increased physical activity and socialization while they had the dog as noted in their daily journal. Paired-sample T tests were conducted and found a significant increase in life satisfaction (p<.05) and morale (p<.01) was noted while a significant decrease in depressive symptoms (p<.05) was reported after a six week interaction with the robotic dog (AIBO). In addition, at the completion of the study the participants identified that AIBO could serve as a companion. Conclusion: Although human to human interaction is best and human to animal is next, robotic animals can elicit some of the positive feelings that are commonly associated with live animals. Robotic dogs can act as companions and are associated with increased life satisfaction, morale and decreased depressive symptoms in socially isolated older adults. Individuals who live alone and cannot have pets may benefit from the companionship of robotic pets.
Keywords:
older adults; Animal assisted therapy; Robotic animals
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14B03
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleRobotic Pets as Companions for Socially Isolated Older Adultsen
dc.title.alternativeHealth Promotion Strategies in the Older Populationen
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Nancy E.en
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Omicronen
dc.author.detailsNancy E. Edwards, PhD, MS, ANP-BC, edwardsn@purdue.edu; Alan M. Beck, ScDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335108-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: Robotic animals have been used in a variety of ways with older adults. Robotic animals have been used in a service function as assistive or physical aides and as an entertainment or companion role. Human interactive robots for entertainment and companionship are increasing in interest and research applications. This projects examined the influence of a 6 week interaction with a robotic dog (AIBO) on depressive symptoms, morale and life satisfaction in socially isolated older adults. Methods: Fifteen older adults interacted with AIBO in their room in an assisted living facility for 6 weeks. The individuals kept the dog in their home for the duration of the study. The individuals lived alone, were over 65 years, had a MMSE over 23 and did not have a pet. Baseline data on morale, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction was obtained. Two weeks later AIBO, a robotic dog, was introduced and allowed to stay with the individual for 6 weeks (Week 8). Participants were invited to interact with AIBO as often as they liked and could do whatever activities they chose. Data collection was completed at the completion of the study. Video recordings of the adult/AIBO interactions were obtained at week 2, week 5 and at week 8 when AIBO was removed. Results: The sample included 13 female and 2 males with a mean age of 84. The majority were Caucasian. The participants reported increased physical activity and socialization while they had the dog as noted in their daily journal. Paired-sample T tests were conducted and found a significant increase in life satisfaction (p<.05) and morale (p<.01) was noted while a significant decrease in depressive symptoms (p<.05) was reported after a six week interaction with the robotic dog (AIBO). In addition, at the completion of the study the participants identified that AIBO could serve as a companion. Conclusion: Although human to human interaction is best and human to animal is next, robotic animals can elicit some of the positive feelings that are commonly associated with live animals. Robotic dogs can act as companions and are associated with increased life satisfaction, morale and decreased depressive symptoms in socially isolated older adults. Individuals who live alone and cannot have pets may benefit from the companionship of robotic pets.en
dc.subjectolder adultsen
dc.subjectAnimal assisted therapyen
dc.subjectRobotic animalsen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:44:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:44:26Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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