2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335128
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student and Faculty Collaboration: Revising a Mentorship Model
Other Titles:
Transforming Nursing Through Education and Collaboration
Author(s):
Klakovich, Marilyn D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Sigma
Author Details:
Marilyn D. Klakovich, DNSc, RN, NEA-BC, mklakovich@apu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, July 24, 2014: Purpose: Students completing a master's in nursing degree in my online program are required to complete a practicum project working with a master's prepared mentor. During the practicum, students implement a scholarly project to meet an educational need or administrate a project in a facility, such as the workplace, or in the community. Given that students have no face-to-face contact with faculty who supervise the capstone practicum course, effective mentors are critical to student success. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the collaborative process used to revise a practicum mentoring model and outcomes from use of this model. Methods: The practicum course is divided into two parts. During part A, students develop a self-directed learning agreement. In part B, students report on their projects and submit all evidence of fulfillment of their learning agreement. The model was initially developed through a qualitative study that included content analysis of student reports (n=263 representing 28 part A classes) of characteristics of effective mentors and then Part B student confirmation of the identified categories. The major categories of characteristics of effective mentors were organized into a pyramid-shaped mentorship model for online program practicum experiences. The base or foundation of the pyramid is comprised of mentor characteristics including background, experience, and education. The central core of the pyramid is formed by mentor qualities and ways the mentor interacts with the mentee (resourceful, inspires and challenges, caring relationship). I presented this model at an international conference and dialogue with the audience suggested the need to refine the model. Consistent with the collaborative approach used for initial development, to allow for student collaboration in model refinement, I posted the model and supporting materials in 5 (n=65) practicum B classes for student input. Based on their recommendations, the mentor qualities and characteristics are reorganized within the pyramid. They believed that the bottom of the pyramid that includes the two cornerstones is the foundation of the model. Thus, the two cornerstones are now nursing knowledge and nursing experience, for without these two key elements, there is not a profession known as nursing. Interconnected between the two cornerstones, in the middle and a very important part of the foundation is caring. The core of the model is now Resourceful with the apex being Inspire and challenge. Professional ladder categories (educator, clinician, researcher, manager) support the base and the core of the model. Once these changes were made, I posted the model in 4 (n = 52) practicum B classes and students confirmed that this model represented their positive experience with their mentor. Results: Students in part A of the practicum have been using the model to help them select an appropriate mentor for their project experience. Additionally, they have been sharing the model with their mentors and use it to establish a relationship and determine the best ways that they can work together throughout the project. Students and mentors report that this provides clarity on how to work together, and gives them additional ideas for creative approaches to use. Since using this model, I have had fewer students report negative mentoring experiences in part B. Conclusion: Mentors play a critical role in guiding, supporting and challenging students to grow personally and professionally throughout the practicum experience, culminating in attainment of a master's degree in nursing. This refined mentorship model that is specific to a practicum conducted in the context of an online program facilitates appropriate selection of mentors and suggests ways that mentors and mentees can work effectively together.
Keywords:
collaboration; mentoring
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14A10
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleStudent and Faculty Collaboration: Revising a Mentorship Modelen
dc.title.alternativeTransforming Nursing Through Education and Collaborationen
dc.contributor.authorKlakovich, Marilyn D.en
dc.contributor.departmentIota Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsMarilyn D. Klakovich, DNSc, RN, NEA-BC, mklakovich@apu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335128-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, July 24, 2014: Purpose: Students completing a master's in nursing degree in my online program are required to complete a practicum project working with a master's prepared mentor. During the practicum, students implement a scholarly project to meet an educational need or administrate a project in a facility, such as the workplace, or in the community. Given that students have no face-to-face contact with faculty who supervise the capstone practicum course, effective mentors are critical to student success. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the collaborative process used to revise a practicum mentoring model and outcomes from use of this model. Methods: The practicum course is divided into two parts. During part A, students develop a self-directed learning agreement. In part B, students report on their projects and submit all evidence of fulfillment of their learning agreement. The model was initially developed through a qualitative study that included content analysis of student reports (n=263 representing 28 part A classes) of characteristics of effective mentors and then Part B student confirmation of the identified categories. The major categories of characteristics of effective mentors were organized into a pyramid-shaped mentorship model for online program practicum experiences. The base or foundation of the pyramid is comprised of mentor characteristics including background, experience, and education. The central core of the pyramid is formed by mentor qualities and ways the mentor interacts with the mentee (resourceful, inspires and challenges, caring relationship). I presented this model at an international conference and dialogue with the audience suggested the need to refine the model. Consistent with the collaborative approach used for initial development, to allow for student collaboration in model refinement, I posted the model and supporting materials in 5 (n=65) practicum B classes for student input. Based on their recommendations, the mentor qualities and characteristics are reorganized within the pyramid. They believed that the bottom of the pyramid that includes the two cornerstones is the foundation of the model. Thus, the two cornerstones are now nursing knowledge and nursing experience, for without these two key elements, there is not a profession known as nursing. Interconnected between the two cornerstones, in the middle and a very important part of the foundation is caring. The core of the model is now Resourceful with the apex being Inspire and challenge. Professional ladder categories (educator, clinician, researcher, manager) support the base and the core of the model. Once these changes were made, I posted the model in 4 (n = 52) practicum B classes and students confirmed that this model represented their positive experience with their mentor. Results: Students in part A of the practicum have been using the model to help them select an appropriate mentor for their project experience. Additionally, they have been sharing the model with their mentors and use it to establish a relationship and determine the best ways that they can work together throughout the project. Students and mentors report that this provides clarity on how to work together, and gives them additional ideas for creative approaches to use. Since using this model, I have had fewer students report negative mentoring experiences in part B. Conclusion: Mentors play a critical role in guiding, supporting and challenging students to grow personally and professionally throughout the practicum experience, culminating in attainment of a master's degree in nursing. This refined mentorship model that is specific to a practicum conducted in the context of an online program facilitates appropriate selection of mentors and suggests ways that mentors and mentees can work effectively together.en
dc.subjectcollaborationen
dc.subjectmentoringen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:44:58Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:44:58Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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