Does Moonlighting Influence South African Nurses' Intention to Leave Their Primary Jobs?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335154
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Moonlighting Influence South African Nurses' Intention to Leave Their Primary Jobs?
Other Titles:
Global Issues Within the Nursing Workforce
Author(s):
Rispel, Laetitia C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Laetitia C. Rispel, PhD, RN, RM, laetitia.rispel@wits.ac.za
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Moonlighting is commonly understood as having a second job, usually part-time, in addition to a primary full-time job. This paper examines whether moonlighting influences South African nurses intention to leave their primary jobs. Methods: During 2010, a stratified random sample of 80 hospitals was selected from the public and private health sectors in four South African provinces. All nurses working in intensive care, theatre, casualty, maternity and general medical and surgical wards on the survey day completed a self-administered questionnaire after obtaining informed consent. In addition to demographic information, the questionnaire focused on the prevalence of moonlighting and participants' intention to leave their primary jobs in the 12 months following the survey. Survey data were analysed using STATA version 10. Results: Survey participants (n=3 784) were predominantly middle-aged (median 42 years). The prevalence of moonlighting in the previous year was 34.1% [95%CI: 32.6- 35.6]. Overall, 1 133 participants (31.5%) indicated that they planned to leave their primary jobs, ranging from a low of 23.4% among nursing auxilliaries to 39% of all nurses working in Gauteng, the wealthiest and most urbanised province in South Africa. 15.5 % of all survey participants indicated that they planned to go overseas in the 12 months following the survey. Among this group, 18.1 % of moonlighters, compared to 14.3% of non-moonlighters planned to go overseas, but this difference was not statistically significant. The odds ratio of moonlighters planning to go overseas compared to non-moonlighters was 1.32 [95% CI: 0.81- 2.16], but this was not statistically significant (p=0.266). Conclusion: This study provides empirical information on whether moonlighting influences nurses' decisions to leave their primary jobs. There is the need for strategies to reduce turnover among South African nurses.
Keywords:
moonlighting; nurses; intention to leave
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14F05
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDoes Moonlighting Influence South African Nurses' Intention to Leave Their Primary Jobs?en
dc.title.alternativeGlobal Issues Within the Nursing Workforceen
dc.contributor.authorRispel, Laetitia C.en
dc.contributor.departmentTau Lambda-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsLaetitia C. Rispel, PhD, RN, RM, laetitia.rispel@wits.ac.zaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335154-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Moonlighting is commonly understood as having a second job, usually part-time, in addition to a primary full-time job. This paper examines whether moonlighting influences South African nurses intention to leave their primary jobs. Methods: During 2010, a stratified random sample of 80 hospitals was selected from the public and private health sectors in four South African provinces. All nurses working in intensive care, theatre, casualty, maternity and general medical and surgical wards on the survey day completed a self-administered questionnaire after obtaining informed consent. In addition to demographic information, the questionnaire focused on the prevalence of moonlighting and participants' intention to leave their primary jobs in the 12 months following the survey. Survey data were analysed using STATA version 10. Results: Survey participants (n=3 784) were predominantly middle-aged (median 42 years). The prevalence of moonlighting in the previous year was 34.1% [95%CI: 32.6- 35.6]. Overall, 1 133 participants (31.5%) indicated that they planned to leave their primary jobs, ranging from a low of 23.4% among nursing auxilliaries to 39% of all nurses working in Gauteng, the wealthiest and most urbanised province in South Africa. 15.5 % of all survey participants indicated that they planned to go overseas in the 12 months following the survey. Among this group, 18.1 % of moonlighters, compared to 14.3% of non-moonlighters planned to go overseas, but this difference was not statistically significant. The odds ratio of moonlighters planning to go overseas compared to non-moonlighters was 1.32 [95% CI: 0.81- 2.16], but this was not statistically significant (p=0.266). Conclusion: This study provides empirical information on whether moonlighting influences nurses' decisions to leave their primary jobs. There is the need for strategies to reduce turnover among South African nurses.en
dc.subjectmoonlightingen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.subjectintention to leaveen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:45:37Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:45:37Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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