Friends Helping Friends: A Peer-Based Programme in Responding to Dating Violence in U.S.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335177
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Friends Helping Friends: A Peer-Based Programme in Responding to Dating Violence in U.S.
Other Titles:
Symposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experience
Author(s):
Amar, Angela Frederick
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Epsilon
Author Details:
Angela Frederick Amar, PhD, RN, DF-IAFN, FAAN, angela.amar@emory.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Dating violence is a public health issues, affecting young women in the college campus. Despite the importance of dating violence, few prevention programs address peer roles and target community responses to dating violence. Providing education to peers on how to help a friend could increase their confidence to help and in turn, increase reporting to formal sources. As a result, we would provide the support and resources that could mitigate health, academic, and social consequences of interpersonal violence. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of Friends Helping Friends, a community level education program to teach young women to recognize and intervene to prevent and respond to interpersonal violence. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with 101 undergraduate students aged 18-22 years participated in Friends Helping Friends and assigned to either a treatment group or control group. Participants completed pre- and post-test measures of attitudes related to sexual and partner violence and willingness to help. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine changes in scores between pre and post-test conditions and to compare the treatment group to the control group. Results: As compared to the control group, treatment group participants reported increased perceived responsibility to help, skills to act as a positive bystander, and intention to help, and decreased rape myth acceptance. Conclusion: Friends Helping Friends shows promise as an effective strategy for older adolescent females in the prevention and response to dating violence.
Keywords:
Program evaluation; Bystander education; Dating Violence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14E11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleFriends Helping Friends: A Peer-Based Programme in Responding to Dating Violence in U.S.en
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experienceen
dc.contributor.authorAmar, Angela Fredericken
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsAngela Frederick Amar, PhD, RN, DF-IAFN, FAAN, angela.amar@emory.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335177-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Dating violence is a public health issues, affecting young women in the college campus. Despite the importance of dating violence, few prevention programs address peer roles and target community responses to dating violence. Providing education to peers on how to help a friend could increase their confidence to help and in turn, increase reporting to formal sources. As a result, we would provide the support and resources that could mitigate health, academic, and social consequences of interpersonal violence. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of Friends Helping Friends, a community level education program to teach young women to recognize and intervene to prevent and respond to interpersonal violence. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with 101 undergraduate students aged 18-22 years participated in Friends Helping Friends and assigned to either a treatment group or control group. Participants completed pre- and post-test measures of attitudes related to sexual and partner violence and willingness to help. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine changes in scores between pre and post-test conditions and to compare the treatment group to the control group. Results: As compared to the control group, treatment group participants reported increased perceived responsibility to help, skills to act as a positive bystander, and intention to help, and decreased rape myth acceptance. Conclusion: Friends Helping Friends shows promise as an effective strategy for older adolescent females in the prevention and response to dating violence.en
dc.subjectProgram evaluationen
dc.subjectBystander educationen
dc.subjectDating Violenceen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:46:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:46:12Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.