Successful Strategies for Recruiting Low-Income Minority Group Women in a Community-Based Health Promotion Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335183
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Successful Strategies for Recruiting Low-Income Minority Group Women in a Community-Based Health Promotion Program
Author(s):
Ayoola, Adejoke B.; Zandee, Gail Landheer; Pennings, Kendra; Schipper, Laura
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Epsilon-at-Large
Author Details:
Adejoke B. Ayoola, PhD, RN, aba3@calvin.edu; Gail Landheer Zandee, MSN, RN; Kendra Pennings, ; Laura Schipper, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: Low-income and minority groups need to be well represented in health promotion studies so as to identify and address the existing health disparities in the U.S. However, studies have shown that it is challenging to successfully recruit low-income and minority groups into a study. The purpose of this study is to describe the strategies that were successful in recruiting low-income minority women into a community-based health promotion program. Methods: This is a simple descriptive study where women were asked during a pre-intervention screening survey about how they learned about the study. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted using STATA 10. Results: Sixty-one (43%) of the 141 women were African American, 38% were Hispanic, and 15% were White. The women were 18 to 55 years of age (mean =31 years), 73% had household income less than $20,000.00. Most of the recruitment was done through community health workers (28.4%) and flyers distributed from house to house in the neighborhoods (27.7%). Fifteen percent of the women heard about the study through community-based agencies. The most successful means of recruitment among African American was through the community health workers, and through flyers distributed in the neighborhoods for Hispanic and White women. Conclusions: Partnership within the neighborhoods through active involvement of resident community health workers and local agencies are successful means of recruiting low-income women from ethnic minority group into a community-based health promotion program.
Keywords:
Low income women; Recruitment; Ethnic minority
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST23
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleSuccessful Strategies for Recruiting Low-Income Minority Group Women in a Community-Based Health Promotion Programen
dc.contributor.authorAyoola, Adejoke B.en
dc.contributor.authorZandee, Gail Landheeren
dc.contributor.authorPennings, Kendraen
dc.contributor.authorSchipper, Lauraen
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Epsilon-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsAdejoke B. Ayoola, PhD, RN, aba3@calvin.edu; Gail Landheer Zandee, MSN, RN; Kendra Pennings, ; Laura Schipper, BSN, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335183-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: Low-income and minority groups need to be well represented in health promotion studies so as to identify and address the existing health disparities in the U.S. However, studies have shown that it is challenging to successfully recruit low-income and minority groups into a study. The purpose of this study is to describe the strategies that were successful in recruiting low-income minority women into a community-based health promotion program. Methods: This is a simple descriptive study where women were asked during a pre-intervention screening survey about how they learned about the study. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted using STATA 10. Results: Sixty-one (43%) of the 141 women were African American, 38% were Hispanic, and 15% were White. The women were 18 to 55 years of age (mean =31 years), 73% had household income less than $20,000.00. Most of the recruitment was done through community health workers (28.4%) and flyers distributed from house to house in the neighborhoods (27.7%). Fifteen percent of the women heard about the study through community-based agencies. The most successful means of recruitment among African American was through the community health workers, and through flyers distributed in the neighborhoods for Hispanic and White women. Conclusions: Partnership within the neighborhoods through active involvement of resident community health workers and local agencies are successful means of recruiting low-income women from ethnic minority group into a community-based health promotion program.en
dc.subjectLow income womenen
dc.subjectRecruitmenten
dc.subjectEthnic minorityen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:46:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:46:21Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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