Am I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335199
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Am I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Study
Other Titles:
Symposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experience
Author(s):
Chan, Claudia Kor Yee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Claudia Kor Yee Chan, RN, MSc, koychan@ouhk.edu.hk
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Young people's attitude towards dating violence and perceived barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships may contribute to their willingness to help peers in abusive relationships. Purpose: This study explored the university students' intention to prevent dating violence and identify the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships by using qualitative approach. Methods: Twenty university students were recruited at Dating Cafe Ambassadors Programme to educate peers in helping to prevent dating violence on university campus. Participants were followed for 3 workshops of participant observations and a focus group interview. An interview guide was used for data collection. Interview questions included what is the definition of dating violence, why do you/don't you help peers in abusive relationships, do you perceive it is your responsibility to help, and describe your expectation of a healthy relationship. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results: Results showed that the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating violence included low awareness of dating violence on campus; and lack of skills and resources to help. Conclusion: The lessons learned from the qualitative study findings will help in develop and refine dating violence prevention and intervention for university students.
Keywords:
Intention to help; Barriers; Dating violence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14E11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAm I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Studyen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experienceen
dc.contributor.authorChan, Claudia Kor Yeeen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsClaudia Kor Yee Chan, RN, MSc, koychan@ouhk.edu.hken
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335199-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Young people's attitude towards dating violence and perceived barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships may contribute to their willingness to help peers in abusive relationships. Purpose: This study explored the university students' intention to prevent dating violence and identify the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships by using qualitative approach. Methods: Twenty university students were recruited at Dating Cafe Ambassadors Programme to educate peers in helping to prevent dating violence on university campus. Participants were followed for 3 workshops of participant observations and a focus group interview. An interview guide was used for data collection. Interview questions included what is the definition of dating violence, why do you/don't you help peers in abusive relationships, do you perceive it is your responsibility to help, and describe your expectation of a healthy relationship. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results: Results showed that the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating violence included low awareness of dating violence on campus; and lack of skills and resources to help. Conclusion: The lessons learned from the qualitative study findings will help in develop and refine dating violence prevention and intervention for university students.en
dc.subjectIntention to helpen
dc.subjectBarriersen
dc.subjectDating violenceen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:46:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:46:45Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.