Am I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335199
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Am I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Study
Other Titles:
Symposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experience
Author(s):
Chan, Claudia Kor Yee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Claudia Kor Yee Chan, RN, MSc
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Young people's attitude towards dating violence and perceived barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships may contribute to their willingness to help peers in abusive relationships. Purpose: This study explored the university students' intention to prevent dating violence and identify the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships by using qualitative approach. Methods: Twenty university students were recruited at Dating Cafe Ambassadors Programme to educate peers in helping to prevent dating violence on university campus. Participants were followed for 3 workshops of participant observations and a focus group interview. An interview guide was used for data collection. Interview questions included what is the definition of dating violence, why do you/don't you help peers in abusive relationships, do you perceive it is your responsibility to help, and describe your expectation of a healthy relationship. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results: Results showed that the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating violence included low awareness of dating violence on campus; and lack of skills and resources to help. Conclusion: The lessons learned from the qualitative study findings will help in develop and refine dating violence prevention and intervention for university students.
Keywords:
Intention to help; Barriers; Dating violence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14E11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAm I Responsible to Help Peers in Abusive Dating Relationships?: Learning From a Qualitative Studyen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons from U.S. and Hong Kong Experienceen
dc.contributor.authorChan, Claudia Kor Yeeen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsClaudia Kor Yee Chan, RN, MScen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335199-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Young people's attitude towards dating violence and perceived barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships may contribute to their willingness to help peers in abusive relationships. Purpose: This study explored the university students' intention to prevent dating violence and identify the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating relationships by using qualitative approach. Methods: Twenty university students were recruited at Dating Cafe Ambassadors Programme to educate peers in helping to prevent dating violence on university campus. Participants were followed for 3 workshops of participant observations and a focus group interview. An interview guide was used for data collection. Interview questions included what is the definition of dating violence, why do you/don't you help peers in abusive relationships, do you perceive it is your responsibility to help, and describe your expectation of a healthy relationship. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results: Results showed that the barriers in responding peers in abusive dating violence included low awareness of dating violence on campus; and lack of skills and resources to help. Conclusion: The lessons learned from the qualitative study findings will help in develop and refine dating violence prevention and intervention for university students.en
dc.subjectIntention to helpen
dc.subjectBarriersen
dc.subjectDating violenceen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:46:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:46:45Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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