The Preliminary Study of Family Resilience and Its Correlates Among Cancer Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335218
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Preliminary Study of Family Resilience and Its Correlates Among Cancer Parents
Author(s):
Chen, Wei-Ching; Chen, Chin-Mi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Wei-Ching Chen, RN, BS, amywings7528@hotmail.com; Chin-Mi Chen, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships of perceived stress, parent-adolescent communication, and family resilience among the parents with cancer. The family resilience framework that was developed by Walsh (2003) was used as the theoretical framework of this study. Methods: The study was a cross-sectional design, and participants were included by convenience sampling. Inclusion criteria were 1) diagnosed with cancer over 3 months, and 2) being parents with adolescent children. Data were collected by a structured questionnaire that consisted of a demographic information datasheet and three scales: perceived stress scale, family resilience scale, and parent-adolescent communication scale. The IRB approvals ensured that participants' human rights were considered and protected. Results: Eleven patients (6 fathers; 5 mothers) were recruited from a medical center in the northern of Taiwan. Mean score of the perceived stress were 23 (SD=1.732) for fathers, and 19 (SD=3.194) for mothers. Mean score of the parent-adolescent communication were 66 (SD=5.489) for fathers, and 68.2 (SD=2.691) for mothers. Mean score of the family resilience were 93.83 (SD=7.855) for fathers, and 89.6 (SD=9.19) for mothers. In addition, family resilience negatively correlated with perceived stress (r = -0.170), and positively with parent-adolescent communication (r = 0.245). Conclusion: These results reveal the feasibility of this study and showed this mean score of each scale may be various between fathers and mothers. Perceived stress and parent-adolescent communication may be the correlates of family resilience. Therefore, we need more participants to prove these preliminary findings.
Keywords:
adolescent; parent with cancer; family resilience
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST240
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Preliminary Study of Family Resilience and Its Correlates Among Cancer Parentsen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Wei-Chingen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Chin-Mien
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsWei-Ching Chen, RN, BS, amywings7528@hotmail.com; Chin-Mi Chen, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335218-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships of perceived stress, parent-adolescent communication, and family resilience among the parents with cancer. The family resilience framework that was developed by Walsh (2003) was used as the theoretical framework of this study. Methods: The study was a cross-sectional design, and participants were included by convenience sampling. Inclusion criteria were 1) diagnosed with cancer over 3 months, and 2) being parents with adolescent children. Data were collected by a structured questionnaire that consisted of a demographic information datasheet and three scales: perceived stress scale, family resilience scale, and parent-adolescent communication scale. The IRB approvals ensured that participants' human rights were considered and protected. Results: Eleven patients (6 fathers; 5 mothers) were recruited from a medical center in the northern of Taiwan. Mean score of the perceived stress were 23 (SD=1.732) for fathers, and 19 (SD=3.194) for mothers. Mean score of the parent-adolescent communication were 66 (SD=5.489) for fathers, and 68.2 (SD=2.691) for mothers. Mean score of the family resilience were 93.83 (SD=7.855) for fathers, and 89.6 (SD=9.19) for mothers. In addition, family resilience negatively correlated with perceived stress (r = -0.170), and positively with parent-adolescent communication (r = 0.245). Conclusion: These results reveal the feasibility of this study and showed this mean score of each scale may be various between fathers and mothers. Perceived stress and parent-adolescent communication may be the correlates of family resilience. Therefore, we need more participants to prove these preliminary findings.en
dc.subjectadolescenten
dc.subjectparent with canceren
dc.subjectfamily resilienceen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:47:11Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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