Using Field Theory to Explore the Resourcefulness of Patients With Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335225
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Field Theory to Explore the Resourcefulness of Patients With Depression
Author(s):
Chien, Chun-O; Lai, Chien-Yu
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Chun-O Chien, RN, MSN, cochien@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Chien-Yu Lai, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the resourcefulness in patients with depression and to understand the personal or social resourcefulness expected by them. Methods: A qualitative research design based on Field Theory with the method of focus group interviewing was used. The participants were recruited via purposive sampling from outpatients department of a medical center in Southern Taiwan. Totally, seven adults with depression were invited and completed the full courses of focus group in this study. Closed groups with six interviews, two hours per time, were implemented to collect data. Content analysis was used to analyze the findings of this study. Results: Three themes in terms of resourcefulness in patients with depression were concluded as follows. The first theme was 'Personal resourcefulness', including four sub-themes such as 'relieving emotional tension by self', 'problem solving', 'positive thinking', and 'self-efficacy'. Depressed adults were used to crying, writing diary, shouting and exercise to relieve their emotional tension. They had tried to avoid the stressors, shifting attention, using relaxation skills and doing some things they enjoyed to get rid of the distress. They also used active approaches such as positive self-encouragement and positive thinking to change their mind. Additionally, they possessed their religious belief and self-efficacy to believe that they can overcome the adversity. Another theme, 'social resourcefulness' was also used to get help from two types of social resources. The first subtheme is 'informal resources' including families, friends and/or relative others. 'Conveying a help-seeking message', 'talking to others', 'asking help from the right person', and 'being with people' were the means they would apply. The second sub-theme is 'formal resources' indicating physicians, psychologists, family education centers and community counseling services. The third theme involved 'the ways to get resourcefulness' with two accesses, including 'the way for personal resourcefulness' and 'the way for social resourcefulness'. Depressed adults expected themselves to effectively use self-efficacy, positive thinking and ways of relieving emotional tension by a well-planned daily schedule or a notice board to remind ones of their personal resources. In addition, in order to acquire listening, company, and timely guidance from others, 'to get involved in social support systems' was what they need. Conclusion: The findings of this study provide clinical staffs to have better understanding about depressed adults' skills of resourcefulness which they usually used. Knowing the gaps in successfully performing the ability of resourcefulness, the training programs constituting resourcefulness skills will be suggested to develop for patients with depression.
Keywords:
depression; Field Theory; resourcefulness
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST241
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleUsing Field Theory to Explore the Resourcefulness of Patients With Depressionen
dc.contributor.authorChien, Chun-Oen
dc.contributor.authorLai, Chien-Yuen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsChun-O Chien, RN, MSN, cochien@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Chien-Yu Lai, RN, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335225-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the resourcefulness in patients with depression and to understand the personal or social resourcefulness expected by them. Methods: A qualitative research design based on Field Theory with the method of focus group interviewing was used. The participants were recruited via purposive sampling from outpatients department of a medical center in Southern Taiwan. Totally, seven adults with depression were invited and completed the full courses of focus group in this study. Closed groups with six interviews, two hours per time, were implemented to collect data. Content analysis was used to analyze the findings of this study. Results: Three themes in terms of resourcefulness in patients with depression were concluded as follows. The first theme was 'Personal resourcefulness', including four sub-themes such as 'relieving emotional tension by self', 'problem solving', 'positive thinking', and 'self-efficacy'. Depressed adults were used to crying, writing diary, shouting and exercise to relieve their emotional tension. They had tried to avoid the stressors, shifting attention, using relaxation skills and doing some things they enjoyed to get rid of the distress. They also used active approaches such as positive self-encouragement and positive thinking to change their mind. Additionally, they possessed their religious belief and self-efficacy to believe that they can overcome the adversity. Another theme, 'social resourcefulness' was also used to get help from two types of social resources. The first subtheme is 'informal resources' including families, friends and/or relative others. 'Conveying a help-seeking message', 'talking to others', 'asking help from the right person', and 'being with people' were the means they would apply. The second sub-theme is 'formal resources' indicating physicians, psychologists, family education centers and community counseling services. The third theme involved 'the ways to get resourcefulness' with two accesses, including 'the way for personal resourcefulness' and 'the way for social resourcefulness'. Depressed adults expected themselves to effectively use self-efficacy, positive thinking and ways of relieving emotional tension by a well-planned daily schedule or a notice board to remind ones of their personal resources. In addition, in order to acquire listening, company, and timely guidance from others, 'to get involved in social support systems' was what they need. Conclusion: The findings of this study provide clinical staffs to have better understanding about depressed adults' skills of resourcefulness which they usually used. Knowing the gaps in successfully performing the ability of resourcefulness, the training programs constituting resourcefulness skills will be suggested to develop for patients with depression.en
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectField Theoryen
dc.subjectresourcefulnessen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:47:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:47:20Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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