The Impact of Yoga Education Among Postmenopausal South Asian Women at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease: A Family Affair

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335241
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Yoga Education Among Postmenopausal South Asian Women at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease: A Family Affair
Other Titles:
Exercising the Chronically Ill
Author(s):
Hoogbruin, Amandah L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Eta
Author Details:
Amandah L. Hoogbruin, RN, BScN, MScN, PhD, amandah.hoogbruin@kpu.ca
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 28, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy of using a random controlled design to measure the effects of a gentle 12 week structured Hatha yoga progam on lipid profile (fasting blood cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides) and blood pressure, as primary outcomes. Other related indices of cardiovascular risk including measures of visceral adiposity (waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI)); insulin sensitivity (fasting glucose/insulin); inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP); sympathetic activity (resting heart rate, heart rate; and perceived stress, mood, and sleep) will be examined as secondary outcomes. The yoga program is based on hatha yoga that has been adapted by the use of props and standardized, scripted poses that can be easily replicated and readily performed by individuals who are elderly, overweight, unfit, or who suffer from a chronic illness. Methods: In Canada, the third largest group of South Asians is located in Surrey, British Columbia. In February, 2013, a 12 week pilot study was implemented consisting of 33, postmenopausal, sedentary, South Asian women who were randomly assigned to participate in either weekly Hatha Yoga education and individual at home yoga sessions, or a no yoga, the control group. Screening assessments were done to at the beginning of the study to obtain baseline data about quality of life and specific markers related to physiological and psychological indices of CVD risk. Repeat screening assessments were done at the end of the yoga intervention (@ 3 months); and at 6 months. Final screening sessions were completed in late September. Results: Applying a yoga intervention and study procedures in a community setting posed unique challenges and required cultural sensitivity. All the study participants indicated that their role as the primary family caregiver greatly influenced their capacity to practice yoga regularly. At the same time, all of them agreed that their families were instrumental in enabling them to attend yoga classes regularly. Conclusion: This pilot study is among the first in Canada to rigorously examine the specific effects of yoga therapy on CVD risk profiles among postmenopausal, sedentary, South Asian women. Given the nature of the intervention (involves lifestyle modification), factors affecting study participants, (i.e., the role of family and its influence on regular yoga practice in the home), need to be considered when implementing a more extensive, clinical trial.
Keywords:
Cardiovascular Disease; Hatha Yoga; Disease Prevention
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14N02
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Impact of Yoga Education Among Postmenopausal South Asian Women at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease: A Family Affairen
dc.title.alternativeExercising the Chronically Illen
dc.contributor.authorHoogbruin, Amandah L.en
dc.contributor.departmentXi Etaen
dc.author.detailsAmandah L. Hoogbruin, RN, BScN, MScN, PhD, amandah.hoogbruin@kpu.caen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335241-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 28, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy of using a random controlled design to measure the effects of a gentle 12 week structured Hatha yoga progam on lipid profile (fasting blood cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides) and blood pressure, as primary outcomes. Other related indices of cardiovascular risk including measures of visceral adiposity (waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI)); insulin sensitivity (fasting glucose/insulin); inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP); sympathetic activity (resting heart rate, heart rate; and perceived stress, mood, and sleep) will be examined as secondary outcomes. The yoga program is based on hatha yoga that has been adapted by the use of props and standardized, scripted poses that can be easily replicated and readily performed by individuals who are elderly, overweight, unfit, or who suffer from a chronic illness. Methods: In Canada, the third largest group of South Asians is located in Surrey, British Columbia. In February, 2013, a 12 week pilot study was implemented consisting of 33, postmenopausal, sedentary, South Asian women who were randomly assigned to participate in either weekly Hatha Yoga education and individual at home yoga sessions, or a no yoga, the control group. Screening assessments were done to at the beginning of the study to obtain baseline data about quality of life and specific markers related to physiological and psychological indices of CVD risk. Repeat screening assessments were done at the end of the yoga intervention (@ 3 months); and at 6 months. Final screening sessions were completed in late September. Results: Applying a yoga intervention and study procedures in a community setting posed unique challenges and required cultural sensitivity. All the study participants indicated that their role as the primary family caregiver greatly influenced their capacity to practice yoga regularly. At the same time, all of them agreed that their families were instrumental in enabling them to attend yoga classes regularly. Conclusion: This pilot study is among the first in Canada to rigorously examine the specific effects of yoga therapy on CVD risk profiles among postmenopausal, sedentary, South Asian women. Given the nature of the intervention (involves lifestyle modification), factors affecting study participants, (i.e., the role of family and its influence on regular yoga practice in the home), need to be considered when implementing a more extensive, clinical trial.en
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen
dc.subjectHatha Yogaen
dc.subjectDisease Preventionen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:47:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:47:43Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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