2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335248
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifetime Support and Management
Author(s):
Freeborn, Donna; Olsen Roper, Susanne; Mandleco, Barbara; Scanlon, Jordan; Dyches, Tina
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Iota-at-Large
Author Details:
Donna Freeborn, PhD, FNP, CNM, donnafreeborn@byu.edu; Susanne Olsen Roper, PhD; Barbara Mandleco, RN, PhD; Jordan Scanlon, RN; Tina Dyches, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: To explore family support and it effects on diabetes management of adults with type 1 diabetes Methods: This study consisted of two in-depth interviews of 23 adult females and 12 adult males ranging in age from 19 to 70 years (M=36.54, SD=16.65). Participants' ages at diagnosis with type 1 diabetes ranged from two to 35 years (M=15.06, SD=9.84) with one to 54 years since diagnosis (M=21.46, SD=12.87). This qualitative study, using the biographical method, consisted of two in-depth interviews. The first interview allowed the participant to answer the prompt "tell me about growing up and living with type 1 diabetes". The interviewers used additional prompts such as "tell me more about" or "can you explain that further" but the participant directed the interview. The second interview took place approximately one week later. This interview began by the interviewers soliciting clarification, if needed, from the first interview. Then interviewers asked questions including: a) Tell us about when you were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes; b) How were your family and friends supportive/non-supportive? c) How compliant have you been throughout your lifetime to your health care regime? d) What were the biggest factors in helping you stay compliant? Results: Factors that increased compliance included: positive family involvement both with siblings and parents; increased early independence in managing their diabetes; education about type 1 diabetes for both children and families; involvement of other influential adults in teaching the importance of diabetes management; motivation to live up to their dreams; and, increased knowledge that compliance was possible. Factors that decreased compliance included: children viewing diabetes as a chore; feeling different from other children and family members; over protective parents who did not encourage independent self-management of diabetes; changing routines such as going on vacation or transitioning to college; and, being stressed due to the emphasis on diabetes management and health. Conclusion: Participants described that at the time of their diagnosis with type 1 diabetes they believed that their life was over and they would never be able to do the things they wanted to do. Children with type 1 diabetes need clear education about their disease, how they can still participate in favorite activities and their role in assuming independent self-management skills. Children and their families all need to be taught that they can lead healthy and normal lives and that they should be optimistic about the future. Type 1 diabetes is a life-time condition and those living with the disease, whether they be children or adults, need support to manage the condition and live healthy, active lives.
Keywords:
Increased compliance; Supportive/non-supportive families; Type 1 diabetes
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST40
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAdults With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifetime Support and Managementen
dc.contributor.authorFreeborn, Donnaen
dc.contributor.authorOlsen Roper, Susanneen
dc.contributor.authorMandleco, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorScanlon, Jordanen
dc.contributor.authorDyches, Tinaen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Iota-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsDonna Freeborn, PhD, FNP, CNM, donnafreeborn@byu.edu; Susanne Olsen Roper, PhD; Barbara Mandleco, RN, PhD; Jordan Scanlon, RN; Tina Dyches, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335248-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: To explore family support and it effects on diabetes management of adults with type 1 diabetes Methods: This study consisted of two in-depth interviews of 23 adult females and 12 adult males ranging in age from 19 to 70 years (M=36.54, SD=16.65). Participants' ages at diagnosis with type 1 diabetes ranged from two to 35 years (M=15.06, SD=9.84) with one to 54 years since diagnosis (M=21.46, SD=12.87). This qualitative study, using the biographical method, consisted of two in-depth interviews. The first interview allowed the participant to answer the prompt "tell me about growing up and living with type 1 diabetes". The interviewers used additional prompts such as "tell me more about" or "can you explain that further" but the participant directed the interview. The second interview took place approximately one week later. This interview began by the interviewers soliciting clarification, if needed, from the first interview. Then interviewers asked questions including: a) Tell us about when you were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes; b) How were your family and friends supportive/non-supportive? c) How compliant have you been throughout your lifetime to your health care regime? d) What were the biggest factors in helping you stay compliant? Results: Factors that increased compliance included: positive family involvement both with siblings and parents; increased early independence in managing their diabetes; education about type 1 diabetes for both children and families; involvement of other influential adults in teaching the importance of diabetes management; motivation to live up to their dreams; and, increased knowledge that compliance was possible. Factors that decreased compliance included: children viewing diabetes as a chore; feeling different from other children and family members; over protective parents who did not encourage independent self-management of diabetes; changing routines such as going on vacation or transitioning to college; and, being stressed due to the emphasis on diabetes management and health. Conclusion: Participants described that at the time of their diagnosis with type 1 diabetes they believed that their life was over and they would never be able to do the things they wanted to do. Children with type 1 diabetes need clear education about their disease, how they can still participate in favorite activities and their role in assuming independent self-management skills. Children and their families all need to be taught that they can lead healthy and normal lives and that they should be optimistic about the future. Type 1 diabetes is a life-time condition and those living with the disease, whether they be children or adults, need support to manage the condition and live healthy, active lives.en
dc.subjectIncreased complianceen
dc.subjectSupportive/non-supportive familiesen
dc.subjectType 1 diabetesen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:47:55Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:47:55Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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