Lifelong Physical Activity as a Predictor in Exercise Beliefs Among Community-Dwelling Adult Over 55 Years of Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335269
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lifelong Physical Activity as a Predictor in Exercise Beliefs Among Community-Dwelling Adult Over 55 Years of Age
Author(s):
Ho, Chiung-Fang
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Chiung-Fang Ho, PhD, can32957@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Background: Previous studies appear to have focused mainly on various predictors that affect exercise behavior rather than exploring people's beliefs on exercise and factors that relate to those beliefs. An increased understanding of exercise beliefs and their related factors may increase people's participation in exercise. Objective: We aimed to improve our understanding of the factors that influence exercise beliefs because this knowledge could help explain low levels of exercise and aid the design of more effective interventions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to identify: (1) the perceived exercise benefits, barriers, and efficacy in community dwelling adults over 55 years of age; (2) to examine the relationship between lifelong physical activity and the perceived benefits, barriers, and efficacy of exercise; and (3) to explore the best predictors of perceived exercise benefits, barriers and self-efficacy. Method: A cross sectional prospective study enrolled a total of 86 Taiwanese aged 55 and older. Multiple regressions were utilized to determine predictors of exercise benefits/barriers and self efficacy when considering demographic, and lifelong physical activity. Outcome variables were measured by the Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale and the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. Results: Findings revealed that lifelong physical activity, living arrangements, and gender significantly predicted exercise self-efficacy (R2=26.2). Further, lifelong physical activity was the only significant contributor to perceived exercise benefits and barriers (R2 = 13.2). Discussion: 'This study is novel in that we found that lifelong physical activity is an important predictor influencing benefits, barriers and self-efficacy of exercise. Living arrangement and gender were also found to be significant contributors to self-efficacy. Health professionals need to assess lifelong physical activity among community-dwelling adults in an effort to improve exercise participation.
Keywords:
Perceived barriers of exercise; Perceived benefits of exercise; Perceived self-efficacy of exercise
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleLifelong Physical Activity as a Predictor in Exercise Beliefs Among Community-Dwelling Adult Over 55 Years of Ageen
dc.contributor.authorHo, Chiung-Fangen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsChiung-Fang Ho, PhD, can32957@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335269-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Background: Previous studies appear to have focused mainly on various predictors that affect exercise behavior rather than exploring people's beliefs on exercise and factors that relate to those beliefs. An increased understanding of exercise beliefs and their related factors may increase people's participation in exercise. Objective: We aimed to improve our understanding of the factors that influence exercise beliefs because this knowledge could help explain low levels of exercise and aid the design of more effective interventions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to identify: (1) the perceived exercise benefits, barriers, and efficacy in community dwelling adults over 55 years of age; (2) to examine the relationship between lifelong physical activity and the perceived benefits, barriers, and efficacy of exercise; and (3) to explore the best predictors of perceived exercise benefits, barriers and self-efficacy. Method: A cross sectional prospective study enrolled a total of 86 Taiwanese aged 55 and older. Multiple regressions were utilized to determine predictors of exercise benefits/barriers and self efficacy when considering demographic, and lifelong physical activity. Outcome variables were measured by the Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale and the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. Results: Findings revealed that lifelong physical activity, living arrangements, and gender significantly predicted exercise self-efficacy (R2=26.2). Further, lifelong physical activity was the only significant contributor to perceived exercise benefits and barriers (R2 = 13.2). Discussion: 'This study is novel in that we found that lifelong physical activity is an important predictor influencing benefits, barriers and self-efficacy of exercise. Living arrangement and gender were also found to be significant contributors to self-efficacy. Health professionals need to assess lifelong physical activity among community-dwelling adults in an effort to improve exercise participation.en
dc.subjectPerceived barriers of exerciseen
dc.subjectPerceived benefits of exerciseen
dc.subjectPerceived self-efficacy of exerciseen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:48:27Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:48:27Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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