Physical Fitness Exercise vs. Cognitive Behavior Therapy on Reducing the Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Elderly Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335282
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Fitness Exercise vs. Cognitive Behavior Therapy on Reducing the Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Elderly Adults
Author(s):
Huang, Tzu-Ting; Chin, Yen-Fan
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Tzu-Ting Huang, PhD, RN, thuang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Yen-Fan Chin, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Aim: To compare the effectiveness of three interventions (physical fitness exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, and comparison) on primary outcomes (depressive symptoms), and secondary outcomes (physical fitness, quality of life, cognitive function, and social support) of community-dwelling elderly adults with depressive symptoms. Background: Depressive inclination is a major problem among community-dwelling elderly adults. The prevalence of depressive symptoms ranges from 10.4% to 39.3%. This indicates the importance of developing effective strategies to reduce depressive symptoms among elderly adults. Methods: Data was collected from May 2011 to April 2012. A randomized controlled trial with three groups (N=57) was conducted in a suburban area of northern Taiwan. Participants were assessed at baseline for demographic data, plus depressive symptoms, physical fitness, cognitive function, quality of life, and social support were also collected at once, 3, and 6 months after interventions. Results: The baseline data of depressive symptoms in the three groups were higher than other post-tests ( time effect, F= 49.92, p= .000); at post test 1, participants in the both experimental groups were significantly less depression than those in the comparison group ( p= .012). Participants in PFE Group were improved their physical fitness than those in the other groups. The baseline data of QOL in the three groups were lower than other post-tests (time effect, F= 9.288, p< .001); at posttest 1, participants in the exercise group were significantly higher QOL than those in the other two groups ( p= .005). The baseline data of cognitive function among these three groups were lower than other post-tests (time effect, F= 8.334, p= .000). And, participants in the three groups differed significantly in social support (interaction effect, F =4.73, p < .01) that indicate the increased perceived social support of elderly adults in the two experiment groups was significantly higher at post tests (p=.000, .011 & .007, respectively) than those in the control group. Conclusion: Participants in both experimental groups were significant in improving the depressive symptoms and perceived social support. In addition, physical fitness exercise can improve their physical fitness, and quality of life, as well. However, if considering for improving physical fitness and quality of life among elderly adults with depressive symptoms, exercise may be a better way to be chosen.
Keywords:
depressive symptoms; cognitive behavior therapy; exercise
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titlePhysical Fitness Exercise vs. Cognitive Behavior Therapy on Reducing the Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Elderly Adultsen
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Tzu-Tingen
dc.contributor.authorChin, Yen-Fanen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsTzu-Ting Huang, PhD, RN, thuang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Yen-Fan Chin, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335282-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Aim: To compare the effectiveness of three interventions (physical fitness exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, and comparison) on primary outcomes (depressive symptoms), and secondary outcomes (physical fitness, quality of life, cognitive function, and social support) of community-dwelling elderly adults with depressive symptoms. Background: Depressive inclination is a major problem among community-dwelling elderly adults. The prevalence of depressive symptoms ranges from 10.4% to 39.3%. This indicates the importance of developing effective strategies to reduce depressive symptoms among elderly adults. Methods: Data was collected from May 2011 to April 2012. A randomized controlled trial with three groups (N=57) was conducted in a suburban area of northern Taiwan. Participants were assessed at baseline for demographic data, plus depressive symptoms, physical fitness, cognitive function, quality of life, and social support were also collected at once, 3, and 6 months after interventions. Results: The baseline data of depressive symptoms in the three groups were higher than other post-tests ( time effect, F= 49.92, p= .000); at post test 1, participants in the both experimental groups were significantly less depression than those in the comparison group ( p= .012). Participants in PFE Group were improved their physical fitness than those in the other groups. The baseline data of QOL in the three groups were lower than other post-tests (time effect, F= 9.288, p< .001); at posttest 1, participants in the exercise group were significantly higher QOL than those in the other two groups ( p= .005). The baseline data of cognitive function among these three groups were lower than other post-tests (time effect, F= 8.334, p= .000). And, participants in the three groups differed significantly in social support (interaction effect, F =4.73, p < .01) that indicate the increased perceived social support of elderly adults in the two experiment groups was significantly higher at post tests (p=.000, .011 & .007, respectively) than those in the control group. Conclusion: Participants in both experimental groups were significant in improving the depressive symptoms and perceived social support. In addition, physical fitness exercise can improve their physical fitness, and quality of life, as well. However, if considering for improving physical fitness and quality of life among elderly adults with depressive symptoms, exercise may be a better way to be chosen.en
dc.subjectdepressive symptomsen
dc.subjectcognitive behavior therapyen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:48:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:48:46Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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