Telling It Like It Is: The Lived Experience of Young People With Type 1 Diabetes in Rural Australia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335296
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telling It Like It Is: The Lived Experience of Young People With Type 1 Diabetes in Rural Australia
Author(s):
James, Ainsley M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Ainsley M. James, BN, GradCertPaeds, GradCertHigherEd, MN, ainsley.james@monash.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this research is to provide an understanding or awareness of what life is like for a young person with Type 1 diabetes living in a rural environment, the challenges they face and the impact (or influence) chronic illness may have on these aspects. Healthcare professionals will be better placed to provide relevant, contextual and adolescent specific care to young people experiencing chronic illness; care that takes into consideration the impact Type 1 diabetes has on a young person at various points in their life by tailoring care that 'fits' into the young person's life. There was a plethora of literature relating to management of symptoms, control of glycaemic levels complications, lifestyle, insulin pumps, activity, nutrition, monitoring and more importantly, searching for a cure; this list is not exhaustive. The missing link appeared to be a lack of published research into the actual meanings of experiences had by young people with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A qualitative approach was implemented and underpinned by Max van Manen's method of phenomenological inquiry. Phenomenological inquiry provides opportunity to explore and describe lived experience of a particular phenomenon, to 'paint a picture' of what living with type 1 diabetes is actually like. The challenges faced and the impact (or influence) chronic illness may have will be highlighted. Participants were male or female, 16-24 years of age, living in rural Victoria Australia, and had type 1 diabetes. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed and transcriptions analysed for themes, utilising van Manen's approach to phenomenological inquiry. Themes were utilised to describe what life is like for young rural people with type 1 diabetes, essentially, their lived experience. Participants were also invited to participate in creating an individual piece of art (of their choosing) that represented their experience of having type 1 diabetes while living in a rural setting. They were asked to interpret the artwork to the researcher, thus adding further depth to their lived experience. The artwork took various forms and included drawings, paintings, photograph/s, poems etc. Results: Results continue to be under investigation. At present participants were provided with a voice to tell their story of what life is like living in a rural setting with type 1 diabetes with the aim to inform healthcare professionals about the participants' experiences. Results will strive to improve the care of young people with type 1 diabetes living in a rural setting by the development of recommendations enabling healthcare professionals to tailor care provided to young people. Results will also inform other young people with type 1 diabetes about the participants' experiences so that these experiences may resonate with other young people. Conclusion: Adolescence can be a time of great change both physically and emotionally and is a challenging period in a young person's life, even without alterations to their health. Adolescents diagnosed with a chronic illness, such as type 1 diabetes experience lifelong changes that some may find difficult to accept and cope with. Being adolescent, living with a chronic illness and residing in a rural environment triples the challenges. Healthcare professionals will be better placed to provide relevant, contextual and adolescent specific care to young people experiencing chronic illness; care that takes into consideration the impact type 1 diabetes has on a young person at various points in their life by tailoring care that 'fits' into the young person's life. Support networks and programs can be designed specifically to meet the needs of young rural people with type 1 diabetes.
Keywords:
type 1 diabetes; young people; lived experience
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST255
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleTelling It Like It Is: The Lived Experience of Young People With Type 1 Diabetes in Rural Australiaen
dc.contributor.authorJames, Ainsley M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsAinsley M. James, BN, GradCertPaeds, GradCertHigherEd, MN, ainsley.james@monash.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335296-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Purpose: The purpose of this research is to provide an understanding or awareness of what life is like for a young person with Type 1 diabetes living in a rural environment, the challenges they face and the impact (or influence) chronic illness may have on these aspects. Healthcare professionals will be better placed to provide relevant, contextual and adolescent specific care to young people experiencing chronic illness; care that takes into consideration the impact Type 1 diabetes has on a young person at various points in their life by tailoring care that 'fits' into the young person's life. There was a plethora of literature relating to management of symptoms, control of glycaemic levels complications, lifestyle, insulin pumps, activity, nutrition, monitoring and more importantly, searching for a cure; this list is not exhaustive. The missing link appeared to be a lack of published research into the actual meanings of experiences had by young people with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A qualitative approach was implemented and underpinned by Max van Manen's method of phenomenological inquiry. Phenomenological inquiry provides opportunity to explore and describe lived experience of a particular phenomenon, to 'paint a picture' of what living with type 1 diabetes is actually like. The challenges faced and the impact (or influence) chronic illness may have will be highlighted. Participants were male or female, 16-24 years of age, living in rural Victoria Australia, and had type 1 diabetes. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed and transcriptions analysed for themes, utilising van Manen's approach to phenomenological inquiry. Themes were utilised to describe what life is like for young rural people with type 1 diabetes, essentially, their lived experience. Participants were also invited to participate in creating an individual piece of art (of their choosing) that represented their experience of having type 1 diabetes while living in a rural setting. They were asked to interpret the artwork to the researcher, thus adding further depth to their lived experience. The artwork took various forms and included drawings, paintings, photograph/s, poems etc. Results: Results continue to be under investigation. At present participants were provided with a voice to tell their story of what life is like living in a rural setting with type 1 diabetes with the aim to inform healthcare professionals about the participants' experiences. Results will strive to improve the care of young people with type 1 diabetes living in a rural setting by the development of recommendations enabling healthcare professionals to tailor care provided to young people. Results will also inform other young people with type 1 diabetes about the participants' experiences so that these experiences may resonate with other young people. Conclusion: Adolescence can be a time of great change both physically and emotionally and is a challenging period in a young person's life, even without alterations to their health. Adolescents diagnosed with a chronic illness, such as type 1 diabetes experience lifelong changes that some may find difficult to accept and cope with. Being adolescent, living with a chronic illness and residing in a rural environment triples the challenges. Healthcare professionals will be better placed to provide relevant, contextual and adolescent specific care to young people experiencing chronic illness; care that takes into consideration the impact type 1 diabetes has on a young person at various points in their life by tailoring care that 'fits' into the young person's life. Support networks and programs can be designed specifically to meet the needs of young rural people with type 1 diabetes.en
dc.subjecttype 1 diabetesen
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.subjectlived experienceen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:49:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:49:05Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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