Chronic Health Conditions and Behaviors Among Persons Entering Maximum Security Prison

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335319
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chronic Health Conditions and Behaviors Among Persons Entering Maximum Security Prison
Other Titles:
Culturally Diverse Health Behaviors
Author(s):
Larson, Elaine; Apa, Zoltan L.; Bai, Jennifer; Befus, Montina B.; Lowy, Franklin D.; Mukherjee, Dhritiman
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Elaine Larson, RN, BSN, MA, PhD, ell23@columbia.edu; Zoltan L. Apa, BS; Jennifer Bai, BS, MPH; Montina B. Befus, BS, MPH; Franklin D. Lowy, BA, MD; Dhritiman Mukherjee, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Monday, July 28, 2014: Purpose: To describe health conditions and risk behaviors among persons entering maximum security prison in New York State. Methods: Between January 2011 and March 2013 as part of a study to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), male (n=426) and female (n=404) inmates at intake to two New York State maximum-security prisons were interviewed regarding demographic, social, and health issues, their medical records were reviewed, and anterior nares and oropharyngeal samples were collected. The majority (>96%) were entering from other jails or prisons. Results: Approximately one-third each were aged <30, between 30-40, or >40 years; 47% were black, 24% white, 20% Hispanic, and 8% other. The largest proportion (44%) had 50% of inmates were colonized with S. aureus; 5.9% of men and 10.6% of women were colonized with MRSA, a rate approximately 10 times higher than in the general population. Conclusion: Men and women entering prison have high rates of chronic health conditions and behaviors that increase their risk of disease and infection. Adequate provision of health services in prison is important to reduce morbidity and prevent transmission of infectious diseases within the prison and after parole.
Keywords:
vulnerable populations; prison health
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14N12
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleChronic Health Conditions and Behaviors Among Persons Entering Maximum Security Prisonen
dc.title.alternativeCulturally Diverse Health Behaviorsen
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Elaineen
dc.contributor.authorApa, Zoltan L.en
dc.contributor.authorBai, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorBefus, Montina B.en
dc.contributor.authorLowy, Franklin D.en
dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, Dhritimanen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsElaine Larson, RN, BSN, MA, PhD, ell23@columbia.edu; Zoltan L. Apa, BS; Jennifer Bai, BS, MPH; Montina B. Befus, BS, MPH; Franklin D. Lowy, BA, MD; Dhritiman Mukherjee, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335319-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Monday, July 28, 2014: Purpose: To describe health conditions and risk behaviors among persons entering maximum security prison in New York State. Methods: Between January 2011 and March 2013 as part of a study to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), male (n=426) and female (n=404) inmates at intake to two New York State maximum-security prisons were interviewed regarding demographic, social, and health issues, their medical records were reviewed, and anterior nares and oropharyngeal samples were collected. The majority (>96%) were entering from other jails or prisons. Results: Approximately one-third each were aged <30, between 30-40, or >40 years; 47% were black, 24% white, 20% Hispanic, and 8% other. The largest proportion (44%) had <high school education, 36% completed high school, and 20% had some college education; the majority (80%) rated their health as excellent or good. The estimated prevalence of medical conditions was: asthma (31.4%), hypertension (14.1%), hepatitis C (9.1%), diabetes (6.9%), HIV (5.9%), renal disease (2.7%). For health-related behaviors, prevalence was: cigarette smoking (74.2%), illicit drug use ever (83.8%), marijuana use ever (76.6%), cocaine use ever (41.3), tattoos (59.1%). Antibiotic use within the previous 6 months was reported by 17.7%. All medical conditions and most behavioral risk factors except tattooing were reported with greater frequency among women than men. Overall, >50% of inmates were colonized with S. aureus; 5.9% of men and 10.6% of women were colonized with MRSA, a rate approximately 10 times higher than in the general population. Conclusion: Men and women entering prison have high rates of chronic health conditions and behaviors that increase their risk of disease and infection. Adequate provision of health services in prison is important to reduce morbidity and prevent transmission of infectious diseases within the prison and after parole.en
dc.subjectvulnerable populationsen
dc.subjectprison healthen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:49:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:49:38Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.