Effects of a Cultural Competence Education Program for Nursing Students in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335346
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Cultural Competence Education Program for Nursing Students in Taiwan
Author(s):
Lin, Chia-Jung; Huang, Mei-Chih
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Beta-at-Large
Author Details:
Chia-Jung Lin, MSN, ta897105@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Mei-Chih Huang, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Background: Cultural competent care is an essential ability for nursing students in current Taiwanese global context. However, little is known about nursing students' knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. Moreover, the creative cultural competence courses were designed and aimed to build up the nursing students' abilities on cultural competence care in clinical setting. The effects of educational intervention are eagerly concerned and require to be evaluated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a selective course on enhancing nursing student's knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted using the mixed method for data collection and analysis. A total of 105 nursing students were recruited from 2-year programs offered by two medical technology universities in Southern Taiwan. The students were assigned to the experimental group (n = 51) and control group (n = 54) according to university. This study was conducted from August 2012 to July 2013. The educational intervention consisted of a 36-hour course entitled Cultural Competence Care that was expected to achieve the five course objectives: 1. Prioritize the social and cultural factors that affect health in designing and delivering care across multiple contexts; 2. Use relevant data sources and best evidence in providing culturally competent care; 3. Promote achievement of safe and quality outcomes of care for diverse populations; 4. Transform systems to address social justice and health disparities; and 5. Participate in continuous cultural competence development. Data were simultaneously collected from both groups pre- and post- the education intervention using structured questionnaires. The questionnaire consists of a demographic profile, the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese version (CCA-CV), the dilemma associated with cultural care, and a self-assessment after complete the course. The CCA-CV included two sub-dimensions which are cultural awareness and sensitivity, and cultural competence behavior. Results: The experimental group was composed of 2 males and 49 females and the control group comprised 54 females, all of whom were grade 2 students. In the experimental and control groups, 96.1% and 94.3% of the students, respectively, had never taken a cultural competence course; 92.2% and 30.2% of the students in experimental group and control group, respectively, believed that offering cultural competence courses is necessary. The percentages of students who were unfamiliar with the word 'cultural competence' were 62.5% in the experimental group and 96.2% in the control group; 39.2% and 51.9% of the students in the experimental group and control group, respectively, had experience in caring for people in culturally diverse populations, such as the aborigines or new immigrants. The three major problems encountered when caring for culturally diverse populations are communication difficulties, unfamiliarity with patients' needs, and a lack of health education brochures with their native language. For both groups used in this study, identifying patient requirements is the task that requires the most assistance when caring for people in culturally diverse populations. In comparison of the pre-test scores between the two groups, there are no significant differences in the scores of CCA-CV and the scores of self-assessment of the course. Regarding cultural competence, the students in experimental group produced significantly higher posttest scores on cultural awareness and sensitivity (p = .02), and cultural competence behavior (p = .03) than the students in control group. The post-test scores of self-assessment of the course on ''basic knowledge'' (p <.001), ''important theme'' (p <.01), ''stereotype of the medical decision-making'' (p <.01), and ''clinical practice skills'' (p <.01) for experimental group were significantly higher than the post-test results for the same items in the control group. All scores of cultural competence behavior and a self-assessment of the course in the pre- and post- test results for the experimental and control group demonstrated statistical significance (see table1). Qualitative analysis of collected data is done in terms of cultural knowledge, affection, skill and behavior, all benefiting from course-related activities. Conclusions: Applying this cultural competence course in nursing students can improve the cultural knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. This study suggests that nursing students need to be educated regarding the cultural competence with diversity population. The researchers recommended the results could be used as a reference in incorporating the cultural competence concept into nursing education.
Keywords:
cultural competence; nursing students; Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese version (CCA-CV)
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14PST177
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEffects of a Cultural Competence Education Program for Nursing Students in Taiwanen
dc.contributor.authorLin, Chia-Jungen
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Mei-Chihen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Beta-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsChia-Jung Lin, MSN, ta897105@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Mei-Chih Huang, PhDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335346-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Background: Cultural competent care is an essential ability for nursing students in current Taiwanese global context. However, little is known about nursing students' knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. Moreover, the creative cultural competence courses were designed and aimed to build up the nursing students' abilities on cultural competence care in clinical setting. The effects of educational intervention are eagerly concerned and require to be evaluated. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a selective course on enhancing nursing student's knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted using the mixed method for data collection and analysis. A total of 105 nursing students were recruited from 2-year programs offered by two medical technology universities in Southern Taiwan. The students were assigned to the experimental group (n = 51) and control group (n = 54) according to university. This study was conducted from August 2012 to July 2013. The educational intervention consisted of a 36-hour course entitled Cultural Competence Care that was expected to achieve the five course objectives: 1. Prioritize the social and cultural factors that affect health in designing and delivering care across multiple contexts; 2. Use relevant data sources and best evidence in providing culturally competent care; 3. Promote achievement of safe and quality outcomes of care for diverse populations; 4. Transform systems to address social justice and health disparities; and 5. Participate in continuous cultural competence development. Data were simultaneously collected from both groups pre- and post- the education intervention using structured questionnaires. The questionnaire consists of a demographic profile, the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese version (CCA-CV), the dilemma associated with cultural care, and a self-assessment after complete the course. The CCA-CV included two sub-dimensions which are cultural awareness and sensitivity, and cultural competence behavior. Results: The experimental group was composed of 2 males and 49 females and the control group comprised 54 females, all of whom were grade 2 students. In the experimental and control groups, 96.1% and 94.3% of the students, respectively, had never taken a cultural competence course; 92.2% and 30.2% of the students in experimental group and control group, respectively, believed that offering cultural competence courses is necessary. The percentages of students who were unfamiliar with the word 'cultural competence' were 62.5% in the experimental group and 96.2% in the control group; 39.2% and 51.9% of the students in the experimental group and control group, respectively, had experience in caring for people in culturally diverse populations, such as the aborigines or new immigrants. The three major problems encountered when caring for culturally diverse populations are communication difficulties, unfamiliarity with patients' needs, and a lack of health education brochures with their native language. For both groups used in this study, identifying patient requirements is the task that requires the most assistance when caring for people in culturally diverse populations. In comparison of the pre-test scores between the two groups, there are no significant differences in the scores of CCA-CV and the scores of self-assessment of the course. Regarding cultural competence, the students in experimental group produced significantly higher posttest scores on cultural awareness and sensitivity (p = .02), and cultural competence behavior (p = .03) than the students in control group. The post-test scores of self-assessment of the course on ''basic knowledge'' (p <.001), ''important theme'' (p <.01), ''stereotype of the medical decision-making'' (p <.01), and ''clinical practice skills'' (p <.01) for experimental group were significantly higher than the post-test results for the same items in the control group. All scores of cultural competence behavior and a self-assessment of the course in the pre- and post- test results for the experimental and control group demonstrated statistical significance (see table1). Qualitative analysis of collected data is done in terms of cultural knowledge, affection, skill and behavior, all benefiting from course-related activities. Conclusions: Applying this cultural competence course in nursing students can improve the cultural knowledge, attitude, skill and behavior of cultural competence. This study suggests that nursing students need to be educated regarding the cultural competence with diversity population. The researchers recommended the results could be used as a reference in incorporating the cultural competence concept into nursing education.en
dc.subjectcultural competenceen
dc.subjectnursing studentsen
dc.subjectCultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese version (CCA-CV)en
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:50:16Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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