ICU Diaries Reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder After Critical Illness in Patients and Family Members

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335376
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ICU Diaries Reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder After Critical Illness in Patients and Family Members
Other Titles:
Symposium: ICU Diary: Supporting the Intensive Care Patients Transition from the ICU
Author(s):
Jones, Christina
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Christina Jones, PhD, MPhil, PgD, Bsc RN, Christina.Jones@sthk.nhs.uk
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Delusional memories from the period of critical illness have been shown to be a major contributor to the later occurrence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The experience of watching the patient being critically ill is also traumatic to families, making them at risk of PTSD. It was hypothesised that an ICU diary could help patients and their families come to terms with their differing memories and so reduce the incidence of PTSD. Methods: A prospective randomised, controlled study was performed in 12 ICUs across 6 European countries. 1 week after ICU discharge the ICU Memory Tool was used to identify recall for delusional memories. 1 month post ICU discharge PTSD related symptoms was assessed using the PTSS-14 and the patients were randomised to receive their diary at this point or after the next interview 3 months post ICU discharge. At 3 months a diagnosis of PTSD was made using the PDS. After the final interview, the control patients also received their diaries. In 2 of the study ICUs relatives were asked to complete the PTSS-14 at 1 month and 3 months post ICU discharge. Results: 352 patients were randomised, 322 (91.5%) completing the 3 month follow-up. 11 patients with undiagnosed, pre-existing PTSD were excluded from the final analysis. The incidence of new PTSD in the intervention group was 5% (8/154), and 13.4% (21/157) in the control group; this was statistically significant (p = 0.013). 30 relatives (15 in the intervention group and 15 in the control group) completed questionnaires at 1 and 3 months. Relatives in the intervention group had reduced PTSD symptom (P = .03). Conclusion: This randomised, controlled trial confirms that an ICU Diary helps patients come to terms with critical illness and reduces PTSD incidence. In addition the diary helps reduce symptoms of PTSD in relatives.
Keywords:
Anxiety; ICU Diary; PostTraumatic Stress Disorder
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14H11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleICU Diaries Reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder After Critical Illness in Patients and Family Membersen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: ICU Diary: Supporting the Intensive Care Patients Transition from the ICUen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Christinaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsChristina Jones, PhD, MPhil, PgD, Bsc RN, Christina.Jones@sthk.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335376-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Delusional memories from the period of critical illness have been shown to be a major contributor to the later occurrence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The experience of watching the patient being critically ill is also traumatic to families, making them at risk of PTSD. It was hypothesised that an ICU diary could help patients and their families come to terms with their differing memories and so reduce the incidence of PTSD. Methods: A prospective randomised, controlled study was performed in 12 ICUs across 6 European countries. 1 week after ICU discharge the ICU Memory Tool was used to identify recall for delusional memories. 1 month post ICU discharge PTSD related symptoms was assessed using the PTSS-14 and the patients were randomised to receive their diary at this point or after the next interview 3 months post ICU discharge. At 3 months a diagnosis of PTSD was made using the PDS. After the final interview, the control patients also received their diaries. In 2 of the study ICUs relatives were asked to complete the PTSS-14 at 1 month and 3 months post ICU discharge. Results: 352 patients were randomised, 322 (91.5%) completing the 3 month follow-up. 11 patients with undiagnosed, pre-existing PTSD were excluded from the final analysis. The incidence of new PTSD in the intervention group was 5% (8/154), and 13.4% (21/157) in the control group; this was statistically significant (p = 0.013). 30 relatives (15 in the intervention group and 15 in the control group) completed questionnaires at 1 and 3 months. Relatives in the intervention group had reduced PTSD symptom (P = .03). Conclusion: This randomised, controlled trial confirms that an ICU Diary helps patients come to terms with critical illness and reduces PTSD incidence. In addition the diary helps reduce symptoms of PTSD in relatives.en
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectICU Diaryen
dc.subjectPostTraumatic Stress Disorderen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:50:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:50:57Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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