2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335378
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ICU Diary: Mind the Gap
Other Titles:
Symposium: ICU Diary: Supporting the Intensive Care Patients Transition from the ICU
Author(s):
Martin, Judy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Delta
Author Details:
Judy Martin, MSN, BSN, RN, jjmartinrn@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Critically ill patients have reported gaps in their memories, distorted perceptions and hallucinations which can contribute to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A review of literature indicated patients have reported not believing they had been that sick causing mistrust of family members and their healthcare team. The purpose of this project was to better understand the effect of the ICU diary on the critically ill patient's transition from the ICU setting. Methods: An evidence-based practice project, based on the IOWA Model of EBP, was conducted in an intensive care setting located in Central Texas, USA. Critically-ill patients (n = 6) who were on the ventilator for at least 24 hours were enrolled in the study. Registered nurses, ancillary staff and family members wrote in the diaries. Photographs were taken of the patient on the ventilator and at various points during their stay with the purpose of providing a visual timeline. Results: One patient was discharged from the hospital but died shortly afterwards. One patient was unenrolled from the study. Four patients completed the study. Results of the study indicated the diary is a therapeutic tool: 1) the four patients chose to keep their diary and to include the photographs in the diary: 2) three of the four patients reported no memories of their stay in the ICU and; 3) one patient had memories of the ICU which included 'horrible' hallucinations. Four patients reported the ICU diary helped them with their transition. Four patients reported the photographs helped them with their transition. Conclusion: The diary is a cost-effective'therapeutic instrument. Observed implications included: 1) family members appeared calmer 2) improved communication between nursing staff and family members and, 3) diary and pictures had a positive effect as evident by the reaction of the patients at the point of delivery.
Keywords:
Anxiety; ICU Diary; PostTraumatic Stress Disorder
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014 ; 17-Nov-2014
Other Identifiers:
INRC14H11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleICU Diary: Mind the Gapen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: ICU Diary: Supporting the Intensive Care Patients Transition from the ICUen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Judyen
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Deltaen
dc.author.detailsJudy Martin, MSN, BSN, RN, jjmartinrn@yahoo.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335376-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Critically ill patients have reported gaps in their memories, distorted perceptions and hallucinations which can contribute to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A review of literature indicated patients have reported not believing they had been that sick causing mistrust of family members and their healthcare team. The purpose of this project was to better understand the effect of the ICU diary on the critically ill patient's transition from the ICU setting. Methods: An evidence-based practice project, based on the IOWA Model of EBP, was conducted in an intensive care setting located in Central Texas, USA. Critically-ill patients (n = 6) who were on the ventilator for at least 24 hours were enrolled in the study. Registered nurses, ancillary staff and family members wrote in the diaries. Photographs were taken of the patient on the ventilator and at various points during their stay with the purpose of providing a visual timeline. Results: One patient was discharged from the hospital but died shortly afterwards. One patient was unenrolled from the study. Four patients completed the study. Results of the study indicated the diary is a therapeutic tool: 1) the four patients chose to keep their diary and to include the photographs in the diary: 2) three of the four patients reported no memories of their stay in the ICU and; 3) one patient had memories of the ICU which included 'horrible' hallucinations. Four patients reported the ICU diary helped them with their transition. Four patients reported the photographs helped them with their transition. Conclusion: The diary is a cost-effective'therapeutic instrument. Observed implications included: 1) family members appeared calmer 2) improved communication between nursing staff and family members and, 3) diary and pictures had a positive effect as evident by the reaction of the patients at the point of delivery.en
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectICU Diaryen
dc.subjectPostTraumatic Stress Disorderen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:51:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:51:00Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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