Disruptive Behavior Between Physicians and Nurses: Building the Interdisciplinary Toolkit for Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335420
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disruptive Behavior Between Physicians and Nurses: Building the Interdisciplinary Toolkit for Change
Other Titles:
Symposium: Workplace Behaviors Affecting Patient Safety: Role of Nurses and Physicians as Partners in Change
Author(s):
Pires, Regina Maria
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon
Author Details:
Nikki S. Polis, PhD, RN, FNAP, nsp421@gmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Healthcare organizations face the challenge of disruptive behavior every day. Addressing these behaviors involves more than talking with the individuals involved. Acknowledging the power gradient as an underpinning of disruptive behavior, the lack of infrastructure to address the issue, the lack of policies and procedures and inconsistent support from leadership to resolve the issues in a meaningful way are essential to developing a zero tolerance culture. Methods: Using results from IRB approved surveys about disruptive behavior from two healthcare organizations and other evidence, behavioral issues and patterns related to disruptive behavior were identified and used as the basis to develop an interdisciplinary toolkit. The intent was to provide comprehensive strategies to deal collaboratively with the power gradient and to identify the required structures and processes needed to resolve this organizational challenge. Results: Survey results were similar between the two healthcare systems and with the 2009 American College of Physician Executive Survey. Disruptive behavior still exists within healthcare organizations, and a comprehensive approach is critical to finally resolve this enduring issue. Conclusion: Developing an evidence based toolkit is an important first step in addressing disruptive behavior. Recognition of the factors influencing disruptive behavior, from the power gradient to the lack of organizational supports, informs the strategies included. Developing policies and procedures and educating all involved about behavioral expectations are approaches to demonstrating the organizational commitment to zero tolerance.
Keywords:
collaboration; disruptive behavior; nurse-physician relationships
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
11 ; 11
Other Identifiers:
INRC14E07
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleDisruptive Behavior Between Physicians and Nurses: Building the Interdisciplinary Toolkit for Changeen
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Workplace Behaviors Affecting Patient Safety: Role of Nurses and Physicians as Partners in Changeen
dc.contributor.authorPires, Regina Mariaen
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilonen
dc.author.detailsNikki S. Polis, PhD, RN, FNAP, nsp421@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335420-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Healthcare organizations face the challenge of disruptive behavior every day. Addressing these behaviors involves more than talking with the individuals involved. Acknowledging the power gradient as an underpinning of disruptive behavior, the lack of infrastructure to address the issue, the lack of policies and procedures and inconsistent support from leadership to resolve the issues in a meaningful way are essential to developing a zero tolerance culture. Methods: Using results from IRB approved surveys about disruptive behavior from two healthcare organizations and other evidence, behavioral issues and patterns related to disruptive behavior were identified and used as the basis to develop an interdisciplinary toolkit. The intent was to provide comprehensive strategies to deal collaboratively with the power gradient and to identify the required structures and processes needed to resolve this organizational challenge. Results: Survey results were similar between the two healthcare systems and with the 2009 American College of Physician Executive Survey. Disruptive behavior still exists within healthcare organizations, and a comprehensive approach is critical to finally resolve this enduring issue. Conclusion: Developing an evidence based toolkit is an important first step in addressing disruptive behavior. Recognition of the factors influencing disruptive behavior, from the power gradient to the lack of organizational supports, informs the strategies included. Developing policies and procedures and educating all involved about behavioral expectations are approaches to demonstrating the organizational commitment to zero tolerance.en
dc.subjectcollaborationen
dc.subjectdisruptive behavioren
dc.subjectnurse-physician relationshipsen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:52:03Z-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:52:03Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.