The Relationship of Maternal BMI and Child Body Size, Home Environment, and Food in Low-Income Minority Women and Children Participating in a Child Obesity Primary and Secondary Prevention Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335425
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Maternal BMI and Child Body Size, Home Environment, and Food in Low-Income Minority Women and Children Participating in a Child Obesity Primary and Secondary Prevention Project
Other Titles:
Symposium: Working with Communities to Address Obesity Across the Lifespan
Author(s):
Reifsnider, Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Upsilon
Author Details:
Elizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, FAAN, WHNP, PHNCS-BC, Elizabeth.Reifsnider@asu.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: The primary and secondary obesity prevention projects were developed through community-based participatory research with a local grass-roots organization and the local WIC program. Both programs focused on nutrition guidance to mothers and encouragement of more physical activity with less time devoted to screen viewing (television and computer). The projects are based on the Ecological Model of Growth (EMG). Methods: The mothers and children were recruited through several WIC clinics within the same county. The instruments used to collect data were based on the EMG and reflected the food environment (24 hour diet recall, Household Food Inventory [HFI]), the level of stimulation in the home (HOME Screening Questionnaire [HSQ], hours of TV viewing), and maternal body size. The results from the first data collection time period for both projects are presented in this paper. Results: The association between fiber and protein was non-significant although approaching significance; the association between fiber and fat were non-significant, and the association between fat and protein was highly significant (p <.000). There were no significant associations between types of food intake and child or maternal BMI. There were significant associations between the Household Food Inventory and the HSQ (p<.03) and between HFI and TV hours (p =.05). Conclusion: The types of food in the home affect mother and child body size. Hours of TV watching and the level of high calorie foods in the house are positively associated. In addition, the amount of high calorie food in the household is associated with the level of stimulation in the home. This could possibly demonstrate that interactions between mother and child involve pleasurable foods (high sugar, high fat). The relationships of maternal and child body sizes may possibly be positively related to number of high calorie foods in the house although this was not conclusively shown in this project.
Keywords:
childhood obesity; community-based participatory research
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
11 ; 11
Other Identifiers:
INRC14H09
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Sponsors:
Supported by National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases 1R01DK096488-01A1; and National Institute of Nursing Research 7R21NR010362-04
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Relationship of Maternal BMI and Child Body Size, Home Environment, and Food in Low-Income Minority Women and Children Participating in a Child Obesity Primary and Secondary Prevention Projecten
dc.title.alternativeSymposium: Working with Communities to Address Obesity Across the Lifespanen
dc.contributor.authorReifsnider, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Upsilonen
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, FAAN, WHNP, PHNCS-BC, Elizabeth.Reifsnider@asu.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335425-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: The primary and secondary obesity prevention projects were developed through community-based participatory research with a local grass-roots organization and the local WIC program. Both programs focused on nutrition guidance to mothers and encouragement of more physical activity with less time devoted to screen viewing (television and computer). The projects are based on the Ecological Model of Growth (EMG). Methods: The mothers and children were recruited through several WIC clinics within the same county. The instruments used to collect data were based on the EMG and reflected the food environment (24 hour diet recall, Household Food Inventory [HFI]), the level of stimulation in the home (HOME Screening Questionnaire [HSQ], hours of TV viewing), and maternal body size. The results from the first data collection time period for both projects are presented in this paper. Results: The association between fiber and protein was non-significant although approaching significance; the association between fiber and fat were non-significant, and the association between fat and protein was highly significant (p <.000). There were no significant associations between types of food intake and child or maternal BMI. There were significant associations between the Household Food Inventory and the HSQ (p<.03) and between HFI and TV hours (p =.05). Conclusion: The types of food in the home affect mother and child body size. Hours of TV watching and the level of high calorie foods in the house are positively associated. In addition, the amount of high calorie food in the household is associated with the level of stimulation in the home. This could possibly demonstrate that interactions between mother and child involve pleasurable foods (high sugar, high fat). The relationships of maternal and child body sizes may possibly be positively related to number of high calorie foods in the house although this was not conclusively shown in this project.en
dc.subjectchildhood obesityen
dc.subjectcommunity-based participatory researchen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:52:10Z-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:52:10Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases 1R01DK096488-01A1; and National Institute of Nursing Research 7R21NR010362-04en
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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