2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335499
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Insertion
Author(s):
Ignacio, Alfie Jay C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Alfie Jay C. Ignacio, DNP, MSN, RN, zulu22373@aol.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Problem/Issue: Patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) often require peripheral intravenous (IV) access to collect blood samples and administer IV medications and fluids. Inadequate IV access can lead to delays in treatment, possible increased length of stay, and patient dissatisfaction. Background: Although ED nurses are generally accustomed in obtaining peripheral IV access, there are a number of patients who are difficult to cannulate. Difficult intravenous access may include patients with chronic illness such as sickle cell, renal failure, cancer, history of intravenous drug abuse, obesity, extremes of age, and hypovolemia. UGPIV access may be an alternative to blind insertion to establish early IV access, start infusion therapy, perform blood withdrawal, and administer medications. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement an evidence-based practice (EBP) guideline for difficult IV access (DIVA) through the use of ultrasound guided IV (USGIV) access techniques. Methods: An evidence-based USGIV access policy/procedure was developed and approved by the Nursing Practice Council. Two unit champions and 6 ED staff nurses completed training which involved didactic educational session, pretest/posttests and return demonstrations. The practice change was implemented and monitored over a 6-month period. USGIV access procedures were documented on data collection forms identifying reason for the difficult stick, number of attempts, time to successful cannulation, site of insertion, and complications. Evaluation of the practice change was conducted during a 3-week period to assess impact on DIVA patient outcomes (number of IV attempts and time to successful cannulation). Results: Findings showed significant differences in nurses’ knowledge regarding DIVA and USGIV access techniques - pretest mean score of 9.6 vs. posttest mean score 16.2 (p value 0.0004). Significant reduction in the number of IV attempts and time to successful cannulation were also observed for USGIV access compared to traditional blind sticks. Average number of IV attempts using USGIV access was 1.11 compared to 4.75 for blind sticks (p value – 0.0001).Average time to successful cannulation for USGIV access was 9.53 min. compared to 46.8 min. for blind sticks (p value – 0.0001). ED nurse feedback was positive, average of 3.4 out of 5 on the level of cannulation difficulty. Discussion: Implementation of an evidence-based policy and procedure for DIVA involving USGIV access techniques can facilitate successful cannulation and impact quality of care by decreasing number of attempts and time required. This can lead to greater patient and nurse satisfaction, reduced length of stay, and lower hospital costs.
Keywords:
ultrasound guided; peripheral IV; intravenous insertion
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUltrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Insertionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIgnacio, Alfie Jay C.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAlfie Jay C. Ignacio, DNP, MSN, RN, zulu22373@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335499-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Problem/Issue: Patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) often require peripheral intravenous (IV) access to collect blood samples and administer IV medications and fluids. Inadequate IV access can lead to delays in treatment, possible increased length of stay, and patient dissatisfaction. Background: Although ED nurses are generally accustomed in obtaining peripheral IV access, there are a number of patients who are difficult to cannulate. Difficult intravenous access may include patients with chronic illness such as sickle cell, renal failure, cancer, history of intravenous drug abuse, obesity, extremes of age, and hypovolemia. UGPIV access may be an alternative to blind insertion to establish early IV access, start infusion therapy, perform blood withdrawal, and administer medications. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement an evidence-based practice (EBP) guideline for difficult IV access (DIVA) through the use of ultrasound guided IV (USGIV) access techniques. Methods: An evidence-based USGIV access policy/procedure was developed and approved by the Nursing Practice Council. Two unit champions and 6 ED staff nurses completed training which involved didactic educational session, pretest/posttests and return demonstrations. The practice change was implemented and monitored over a 6-month period. USGIV access procedures were documented on data collection forms identifying reason for the difficult stick, number of attempts, time to successful cannulation, site of insertion, and complications. Evaluation of the practice change was conducted during a 3-week period to assess impact on DIVA patient outcomes (number of IV attempts and time to successful cannulation). Results: Findings showed significant differences in nurses’ knowledge regarding DIVA and USGIV access techniques - pretest mean score of 9.6 vs. posttest mean score 16.2 (p value 0.0004). Significant reduction in the number of IV attempts and time to successful cannulation were also observed for USGIV access compared to traditional blind sticks. Average number of IV attempts using USGIV access was 1.11 compared to 4.75 for blind sticks (p value – 0.0001).Average time to successful cannulation for USGIV access was 9.53 min. compared to 46.8 min. for blind sticks (p value – 0.0001). ED nurse feedback was positive, average of 3.4 out of 5 on the level of cannulation difficulty. Discussion: Implementation of an evidence-based policy and procedure for DIVA involving USGIV access techniques can facilitate successful cannulation and impact quality of care by decreasing number of attempts and time required. This can lead to greater patient and nurse satisfaction, reduced length of stay, and lower hospital costs.en_GB
dc.subjectultrasound guideden_GB
dc.subjectperipheral IVen_GB
dc.subjectintravenous insertionen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:53:55Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:53:55Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.