2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335506
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Substance Abuse Awareness Seminar for Nursing Students
Author(s):
Epeneter, Beverly J.; Butell, Sue
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Mu
Author Details:
Beverly J. Epeneter, EdD, MN, bepenet@linfield.edu; Sue Butell, MSN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Substance abuse is a public health problem worldwide. In fact, it is estimated that 2 billion people are alcohol users, 1/3 billion are smokers, and 185 million are drug users (WHO, 2002). To respond to this significant health issue, the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA, 2002) and American Nurses Association (ANA, 2002) passed resolutions calling for nurse educators to address the risk of addiction. Prevention of this health problem should begin within our own nursing profession. Although the prevalence of substance abuse disorders among nurses is approximately the same rate as in the general population (Kenna & Lewis, 2008), there are certain risk factors, like access to drugs and job stress (Trinkoff, Storr, & Wall, 1999) that make nurses more susceptible to substance abuse. Unfortunately, nurses often lack the awareness and skill to recognize and even help a colleague who may have a substance abuse problem. This lack of preparedness can enable nurses to continue unsafe practices by making excuses or covering up their nurse colleague’s mistakes (Quinlan, 2003). To respond to the gap in nursing students’ education about the risks of addiction within the profession and how best to handle a colleague suspected of abusing a substance, we developed a two-hour evidence based prevention seminar for senior nursing students. The first hour addressed the ethical challenge of unsafe practice including the statistical picture of substance abuse in nurses, the duty to report as outlined by the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses (ANA, 2001), and how substance abuse may impair a nurse’s work performance and conduct. A communication model called NUDGE (Notice, Understand, Decide, use Guidelines, and Encourage (Bennett, 2010) was taught and demonstrated in a role-play scenario. In the second hour, students in triads practiced this skill by rotating the roles of nudger, resister, and observer with a case scenario provided. The results of an intervention follow-up study support the effectiveness of the prevention seminar in affecting knowledge about substance use disorders and the nurses’ role in intervening when substance use behaviors are observed. The seminar also increased students’ confidence in addressing future colleagues where substance abuse may jeopardize safe nursing practice.
Keywords:
Nursing students; Substance abuse; Communication techniques
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Substance Abuse Awareness Seminar for Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEpeneter, Beverly J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorButell, Sueen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentXi Muen_GB
dc.author.detailsBeverly J. Epeneter, EdD, MN, bepenet@linfield.edu; Sue Butell, MSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335506-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Substance abuse is a public health problem worldwide. In fact, it is estimated that 2 billion people are alcohol users, 1/3 billion are smokers, and 185 million are drug users (WHO, 2002). To respond to this significant health issue, the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA, 2002) and American Nurses Association (ANA, 2002) passed resolutions calling for nurse educators to address the risk of addiction. Prevention of this health problem should begin within our own nursing profession. Although the prevalence of substance abuse disorders among nurses is approximately the same rate as in the general population (Kenna & Lewis, 2008), there are certain risk factors, like access to drugs and job stress (Trinkoff, Storr, & Wall, 1999) that make nurses more susceptible to substance abuse. Unfortunately, nurses often lack the awareness and skill to recognize and even help a colleague who may have a substance abuse problem. This lack of preparedness can enable nurses to continue unsafe practices by making excuses or covering up their nurse colleague’s mistakes (Quinlan, 2003). To respond to the gap in nursing students’ education about the risks of addiction within the profession and how best to handle a colleague suspected of abusing a substance, we developed a two-hour evidence based prevention seminar for senior nursing students. The first hour addressed the ethical challenge of unsafe practice including the statistical picture of substance abuse in nurses, the duty to report as outlined by the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses (ANA, 2001), and how substance abuse may impair a nurse’s work performance and conduct. A communication model called NUDGE (Notice, Understand, Decide, use Guidelines, and Encourage (Bennett, 2010) was taught and demonstrated in a role-play scenario. In the second hour, students in triads practiced this skill by rotating the roles of nudger, resister, and observer with a case scenario provided. The results of an intervention follow-up study support the effectiveness of the prevention seminar in affecting knowledge about substance use disorders and the nurses’ role in intervening when substance use behaviors are observed. The seminar also increased students’ confidence in addressing future colleagues where substance abuse may jeopardize safe nursing practice.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectSubstance abuseen_GB
dc.subjectCommunication techniquesen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:54:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:54:02Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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