Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Preeclampsia Among First-Generation Nigerian Women in the United States

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335508
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Preeclampsia Among First-Generation Nigerian Women in the United States
Author(s):
Okpomeshine, Christine
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Nu
Author Details:
Christine Okpomeshine, PhD, RN, WHNP, cokpomeshine@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Although numerous studies have documented the need for early recognition and treatment of preeclampsia to attain a good prognosis, first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States tend to seek obstetrical care after the first trimester (12 weeks), by which time prompt recognition may be missed. The purpose of this study was to measure the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about preeclampsia and limitations that determine the delay in seeking obstetrical treatment in early pregnancy among first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States.'Methods: This cross-sectional quantitative study consisted of 180 first-generation Nigerian women in the United States recalling their experiences of being diagnosed with preeclampsia and experiencing preeclampsia. The health-belief model served as the conceptual framework to predict the health behaviors of first-generation Nigerian women regarding their experiences in early recognition of signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Data were collected through an online survey and analyzed using binary and ordinal logistic regression.'Results: The results indicated no statistical significance relation between knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of preeclampsia and demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, acculturation, and access to healthcare.'Conclusion: Despite the non significance, these findings will help women better understand how to make positive health decisions and support the efforts of public health departments to produce and distribute a booklet on preeclampsia to all healthcare providers regarding the importance of early detection. This study contributes to positive social change by bringing awareness of preeclampsia, risk factors, and the need for early recognition and prompt treatment to first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States.
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
11 ; 11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleKnowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Preeclampsia Among First-Generation Nigerian Women in the United Statesen
dc.contributor.authorOkpomeshine, Christineen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Nuen
dc.author.detailsChristine Okpomeshine, PhD, RN, WHNP, cokpomeshine@yahoo.comen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335508-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Although numerous studies have documented the need for early recognition and treatment of preeclampsia to attain a good prognosis, first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States tend to seek obstetrical care after the first trimester (12 weeks), by which time prompt recognition may be missed. The purpose of this study was to measure the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about preeclampsia and limitations that determine the delay in seeking obstetrical treatment in early pregnancy among first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States.'Methods: This cross-sectional quantitative study consisted of 180 first-generation Nigerian women in the United States recalling their experiences of being diagnosed with preeclampsia and experiencing preeclampsia. The health-belief model served as the conceptual framework to predict the health behaviors of first-generation Nigerian women regarding their experiences in early recognition of signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Data were collected through an online survey and analyzed using binary and ordinal logistic regression.'Results: The results indicated no statistical significance relation between knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of preeclampsia and demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, acculturation, and access to healthcare.'Conclusion: Despite the non significance, these findings will help women better understand how to make positive health decisions and support the efforts of public health departments to produce and distribute a booklet on preeclampsia to all healthcare providers regarding the importance of early detection. This study contributes to positive social change by bringing awareness of preeclampsia, risk factors, and the need for early recognition and prompt treatment to first-generation Nigerian women living in the United States.en
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:54:04Z-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:54:04Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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