2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335549
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Translating the DASH Diet Into Practice
Author(s):
Laforteza, Jozelle; Clark, Mary Jo; Daramola, Iyabo; James, Kathy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Mu
Author Details:
Jozelle Laforteza, RN, BSN, PHN, jozellelaforteza@sandiego.edu; Mary Jo Clark, PhD, RN, PHN; Iyabo Daramola, MD; Kathy James, DNSc, APRN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Project Aim: The purpose of the project was to apply high-intensity counseling to improve compliance with dietary and physical activity recommendations and decrease in blood pressure (BP) levels among hypertensive adults. Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for the two leading causes of death in the United States, heart attack and stroke. Although guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension recommend adoption of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, there is lack of compliance with these recommendations in practice. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999 to 2004 indicated only 19% of hypertensive adults were DASH accordant. Seven out of seven hypertensive patients seen in a local primary care setting were found to be non-compliant with the DASH diet.  The medical director of the practice reported the majority of the hypertensive adults seen were non-DASH diet accordant. Poor compliance leads to progression of pre-hypertension to hypertension and poorly controlled blood pressure (BP) among hypertensive patients. Evidence consistently shows time-intensive counseling generally produces larger changes in dietary behavior than less time-intensive interventions. Despite the evidence in support of time-intensive counseling, current lifestyle modification counseling in the local primary care setting was only limited to office visits. Project Approach: Hypertensive adults seen in a primary care setting participated in three 1-hour group classes and two 20-minute individual telephone follow-ups. Participants completed a 24-hour dietary intake recall pre- and post-intervention. Pre-intervention systolic BP (SBP) was obtained through chart review, and post-intervention SBP was obtained through BP measurements during the final class session. The percentages of participants engaged in DASH-related behavioral changes and who had decreased BP were used to evaluate data. Outcomes: Data collection currently in progress, however it is expected there will be an increase in percentages of participants engaged in DASH-related behavioral changes and those with lower BP. Conclusions: To be determined following review and analysis of results. It is expected high-intensity diet counseling in primary care will show early success in decreasing cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients seen in primary care. If successful, investment in high-intensity diet and lifestyle counseling should be considered among high-risk patients in the primary care setting.
Keywords:
Physical Activity/Exercise; Evidence Based Practice/Research Utilization; Health Promotion/Illness Prevention
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranslating the DASH Diet Into Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaforteza, Jozelleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClark, Mary Joen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDaramola, Iyaboen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJames, Kathyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Muen_GB
dc.author.detailsJozelle Laforteza, RN, BSN, PHN, jozellelaforteza@sandiego.edu; Mary Jo Clark, PhD, RN, PHN; Iyabo Daramola, MD; Kathy James, DNSc, APRN, FAANen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335549-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Project Aim: The purpose of the project was to apply high-intensity counseling to improve compliance with dietary and physical activity recommendations and decrease in blood pressure (BP) levels among hypertensive adults. Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for the two leading causes of death in the United States, heart attack and stroke. Although guidelines to prevent and treat hypertension recommend adoption of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, there is lack of compliance with these recommendations in practice. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999 to 2004 indicated only 19% of hypertensive adults were DASH accordant. Seven out of seven hypertensive patients seen in a local primary care setting were found to be non-compliant with the DASH diet.  The medical director of the practice reported the majority of the hypertensive adults seen were non-DASH diet accordant. Poor compliance leads to progression of pre-hypertension to hypertension and poorly controlled blood pressure (BP) among hypertensive patients. Evidence consistently shows time-intensive counseling generally produces larger changes in dietary behavior than less time-intensive interventions. Despite the evidence in support of time-intensive counseling, current lifestyle modification counseling in the local primary care setting was only limited to office visits. Project Approach: Hypertensive adults seen in a primary care setting participated in three 1-hour group classes and two 20-minute individual telephone follow-ups. Participants completed a 24-hour dietary intake recall pre- and post-intervention. Pre-intervention systolic BP (SBP) was obtained through chart review, and post-intervention SBP was obtained through BP measurements during the final class session. The percentages of participants engaged in DASH-related behavioral changes and who had decreased BP were used to evaluate data. Outcomes: Data collection currently in progress, however it is expected there will be an increase in percentages of participants engaged in DASH-related behavioral changes and those with lower BP. Conclusions: To be determined following review and analysis of results. It is expected high-intensity diet counseling in primary care will show early success in decreasing cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients seen in primary care. If successful, investment in high-intensity diet and lifestyle counseling should be considered among high-risk patients in the primary care setting.en_GB
dc.subjectPhysical Activity/Exerciseen_GB
dc.subjectEvidence Based Practice/Research Utilizationen_GB
dc.subjectHealth Promotion/Illness Preventionen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:54:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:54:44Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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