2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335554
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Migraine Triggered Following Endoscopic Foreheadplasty Surgery
Author(s):
Lassegard, Julia
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Tau-at-Large
Author Details:
Julia Lassegard, RN, CRNA, MS, j.lassegard@ucla.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to examine headache pain experienced by women following EFS, an extracranial surgical dissection involving the trigeminal nerve. Specifically, this study described: 1) intensity, location, quality, and duration of headache pain; 2) compare headache experience following EFS with migraine; 3) examine medication use and perceived relief; 4) to evaluate the relationship between headache pain and a) emotional status and b) functional status; and 5) to evaluate the effect of estrogen levels on headache for women following endoscopic foreheadplasty surgery (EFS). Methods: Forty-two women (44-74 years of age) undergoing EFS were recruited from ten cosmetic surgeon private practice offices in three southern California counties. Four telephone interviews were conducted on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 30 using two questionnaires, the Acute Short-Form 12v2 and Headache Questionnaire. Results: Most women experienced bilateral headache (97%), with the majority reporting severe to moderate pain (71%), which was not consistently relieved with prescriptive strategies. Most women 78% (N=33) experience pain with symptoms meeting International Headache Society Criteria for migraine or probable migraine for. Physical health scores were significantly below normal on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3 and 7 (p<0.05), and had recovered on POD 30. Mental health scores were below normal on postoperative days 1 and 3, returning to baseline by POD seven. These study findings present for the first time evidence that migraine can occur from extracranial events. Conclusion: Women experience pain following EFS, which is usually similar to migraine. This similarity suggests that, for some patients, migraine preventives may benefit management of postoperative headache pain. With regards migraines outside of the context of EFS, these findings raise the possibility that some episodes are initiated by extracranial events activating the trigeminovascular system. This study also offers more evidence that HRTs and with a history of migraine both influenced headache episodes and characteristics. It would be of interest to explore if HRTs and history of migraine has influence on other medical conditions and surgical procedures with and without pain. The findings of major influences of HRT and migraine family history on pain experience suggest these factors may predict varying pain responses to other medical conditions or procedures. In summary, management of EFS patients postoperatively should address pain which may last for up to a month, and which may not be well controlled with standard medications.
Keywords:
Postoperative; Trigeminovascular; Headache/Migraine
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMigraine Triggered Following Endoscopic Foreheadplasty Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLassegard, Juliaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Tau-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsJulia Lassegard, RN, CRNA, MS, j.lassegard@ucla.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335554-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Sunday, July 27, 2014: Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to examine headache pain experienced by women following EFS, an extracranial surgical dissection involving the trigeminal nerve. Specifically, this study described: 1) intensity, location, quality, and duration of headache pain; 2) compare headache experience following EFS with migraine; 3) examine medication use and perceived relief; 4) to evaluate the relationship between headache pain and a) emotional status and b) functional status; and 5) to evaluate the effect of estrogen levels on headache for women following endoscopic foreheadplasty surgery (EFS). Methods: Forty-two women (44-74 years of age) undergoing EFS were recruited from ten cosmetic surgeon private practice offices in three southern California counties. Four telephone interviews were conducted on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, and 30 using two questionnaires, the Acute Short-Form 12v2 and Headache Questionnaire. Results: Most women experienced bilateral headache (97%), with the majority reporting severe to moderate pain (71%), which was not consistently relieved with prescriptive strategies. Most women 78% (N=33) experience pain with symptoms meeting International Headache Society Criteria for migraine or probable migraine for. Physical health scores were significantly below normal on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3 and 7 (p<0.05), and had recovered on POD 30. Mental health scores were below normal on postoperative days 1 and 3, returning to baseline by POD seven. These study findings present for the first time evidence that migraine can occur from extracranial events. Conclusion: Women experience pain following EFS, which is usually similar to migraine. This similarity suggests that, for some patients, migraine preventives may benefit management of postoperative headache pain. With regards migraines outside of the context of EFS, these findings raise the possibility that some episodes are initiated by extracranial events activating the trigeminovascular system. This study also offers more evidence that HRTs and with a history of migraine both influenced headache episodes and characteristics. It would be of interest to explore if HRTs and history of migraine has influence on other medical conditions and surgical procedures with and without pain. The findings of major influences of HRT and migraine family history on pain experience suggest these factors may predict varying pain responses to other medical conditions or procedures. In summary, management of EFS patients postoperatively should address pain which may last for up to a month, and which may not be well controlled with standard medications.en_GB
dc.subjectPostoperativeen_GB
dc.subjectTrigeminovascularen_GB
dc.subjectHeadache/Migraineen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:54:51Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:54:51Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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