Engaging Interprofessional Colleagues in a Collaborative Community of Faculty Scholars

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335576
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engaging Interprofessional Colleagues in a Collaborative Community of Faculty Scholars
Author(s):
Shirey, Maria R.; Bonham, C. Elizabeth
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Maria R. Shirey, PhD, MBA, MS, BSN, RN, mrshirey@uab.edu; C. Elizabeth Bonham, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: This study evaluated outcomes associated with implementation of an academic Community of Faculty Scholars (CFS). Methods: A correlational, repeated measures mixed methods design was used to answer the research question:  What effect does a faculty writing mentoring program have in cultivating a culture of scholarly inquiry?  The intervention consisted of three phases.  Phase I, used a scholarly writing retreat to inaugurate a CFS.  Faculty writing groups paired scholar mentors with scholar fellows for a one year partnership.  Phase II, initiated customized strategies to support mentors and fellows.  Phase III, entailed celebration and closure. Twenty interprofessional fellows collaborated with five mentors.  In Phases I and III, fellows completed pre/post scales: Inner Strength Scale, Resourcefulness Scale, Climate and Culture Assessment Survey.  Program evaluations took place in Phases I, II, and III with number of publications assessed.  Paired t-tests analyzed pre/post scale scores.  Narrative analysis evaluated qualitative data across phases.  Results: Early findings from the one year CFS indicate five (25%) participants published manuscripts, six (30%) had manuscripts in process, and nine (45%) made no progress on manuscript preparation.  All participants reported personal benefit from the CFS experience independent of whether or not they experienced publication success.  All fellows successfully publishing, however, demonstrated five scholar readiness characteristics:  early tenure track participation, individual follow through with commitments, short mentorship requirements, go-getter temperaments, and predisposition to action as compared to contemplation. Conclusion: Although scholarly writing is a hallmark of academic life, faculty members do not report receiving consistent mentoring in this area. Participants in this study reported benefit from the CFS intervention.  Faculty members also demonstrated having different scholarly needs at different times.  For most benefit, investment in a resource intensive CFS intervention may need to be targeted to faculty members demonstrating scholarly readiness.  Further study is needed to identify how best to support faculty members lacking scholarly readiness.
Keywords:
community of faculty scholars; scholarly writing; interprofessional collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngaging Interprofessional Colleagues in a Collaborative Community of Faculty Scholarsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShirey, Maria R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBonham, C. Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMaria R. Shirey, PhD, MBA, MS, BSN, RN, mrshirey@uab.edu; C. Elizabeth Bonham, PhD, MSN, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335576-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: This study evaluated outcomes associated with implementation of an academic Community of Faculty Scholars (CFS). Methods: A correlational, repeated measures mixed methods design was used to answer the research question:  What effect does a faculty writing mentoring program have in cultivating a culture of scholarly inquiry?  The intervention consisted of three phases.  Phase I, used a scholarly writing retreat to inaugurate a CFS.  Faculty writing groups paired scholar mentors with scholar fellows for a one year partnership.  Phase II, initiated customized strategies to support mentors and fellows.  Phase III, entailed celebration and closure. Twenty interprofessional fellows collaborated with five mentors.  In Phases I and III, fellows completed pre/post scales: Inner Strength Scale, Resourcefulness Scale, Climate and Culture Assessment Survey.  Program evaluations took place in Phases I, II, and III with number of publications assessed.  Paired t-tests analyzed pre/post scale scores.  Narrative analysis evaluated qualitative data across phases.  Results: Early findings from the one year CFS indicate five (25%) participants published manuscripts, six (30%) had manuscripts in process, and nine (45%) made no progress on manuscript preparation.  All participants reported personal benefit from the CFS experience independent of whether or not they experienced publication success.  All fellows successfully publishing, however, demonstrated five scholar readiness characteristics:  early tenure track participation, individual follow through with commitments, short mentorship requirements, go-getter temperaments, and predisposition to action as compared to contemplation. Conclusion: Although scholarly writing is a hallmark of academic life, faculty members do not report receiving consistent mentoring in this area. Participants in this study reported benefit from the CFS intervention.  Faculty members also demonstrated having different scholarly needs at different times.  For most benefit, investment in a resource intensive CFS intervention may need to be targeted to faculty members demonstrating scholarly readiness.  Further study is needed to identify how best to support faculty members lacking scholarly readiness.en_GB
dc.subjectcommunity of faculty scholarsen_GB
dc.subjectscholarly writingen_GB
dc.subjectinterprofessional collaborationen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:55:13Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:55:13Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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