2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335596
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spirituality as a Predictive Factor for Signing an Organ Donor Card
Author(s):
Melnikov, Semyon; Peles Bortz, Anat; Ashkenazi, Tamar
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Semyon Melnikov, RN, PhD, melniko@post.tau.ac.il; Anat Peles Bortz, RN, PhD; Tamar Ashkenazi, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Organ donation in the Western world is entirely dependent on the willingness of people to donate organs after their death. In Israel, the wish to donate organs posthumously is expressed by signing an organ donor card. Spirituality as the fundamental dimension of people's overall well-being might affect the willingness to sign an organ donor card. The purpose of the current study was to examine the differences in spirituality and attitudes toward organ donation between people who signed and those who did not sign an organ donor card. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey. The sample included 312 respondents from the general population. Respondents completed a web-based questionnaire consisting of three sections: spirituality, attitudes towards organ donation, and social-demographic questions. Results: The differences in mean scores between respondents who signed an organ donor card and those who didn’t were indicated in transcendental spirituality (p<.01) and attitudes toward organ donation (p<.01). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in the overall spirituality mean score. The spiritual transcendental dimension and attitudes toward organ donation explained 24.9% of the variance of signing an organ donor card. Conclusion: Signing an organ donor card can be explained by low levels of transcendental spirituality and positive attitudes toward organ donation. Nurses should assess the patient’s spiritual needs in order to construct appropriate programs for promoting signing an organ donor card.
Keywords:
Organ donor card; Spirituality
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpirituality as a Predictive Factor for Signing an Organ Donor Carden_GB
dc.contributor.authorMelnikov, Semyonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPeles Bortz, Anaten_GB
dc.contributor.authorAshkenazi, Tamaren_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsSemyon Melnikov, RN, PhD, melniko@post.tau.ac.il; Anat Peles Bortz, RN, PhD; Tamar Ashkenazi, RN, PhDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335596-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Purpose: Organ donation in the Western world is entirely dependent on the willingness of people to donate organs after their death. In Israel, the wish to donate organs posthumously is expressed by signing an organ donor card. Spirituality as the fundamental dimension of people's overall well-being might affect the willingness to sign an organ donor card. The purpose of the current study was to examine the differences in spirituality and attitudes toward organ donation between people who signed and those who did not sign an organ donor card. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey. The sample included 312 respondents from the general population. Respondents completed a web-based questionnaire consisting of three sections: spirituality, attitudes towards organ donation, and social-demographic questions. Results: The differences in mean scores between respondents who signed an organ donor card and those who didn’t were indicated in transcendental spirituality (p<.01) and attitudes toward organ donation (p<.01). No statistically significant difference was found between the groups in the overall spirituality mean score. The spiritual transcendental dimension and attitudes toward organ donation explained 24.9% of the variance of signing an organ donor card. Conclusion: Signing an organ donor card can be explained by low levels of transcendental spirituality and positive attitudes toward organ donation. Nurses should assess the patient’s spiritual needs in order to construct appropriate programs for promoting signing an organ donor card.en_GB
dc.subjectOrgan donor carden_GB
dc.subjectSpiritualityen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:55:34Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:55:34Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.