The Experiences of Stigma As Described by Taiwanese People Living With Schizophrenia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335627
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experiences of Stigma As Described by Taiwanese People Living With Schizophrenia
Author(s):
Ku, Yu-Hui; Hong, Rei-Mei; Su, Ji-An
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Yu-Hui Ku, RN, BSN, elevenguu@gmail.com; Rei-Mei Hong, RN, PhD; Ji-An Su, MD, MS
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: People with schizophrenia have chronic and regressive features which make patients remain partial residual symptoms even if patients have received regularly medication treatment. These symptoms not only cause discrimination and stigma but also influence patients’ psychology, marriage, interpersonal relationship, and occupation. For Chinese people, stigma may be much more serious and particularly significant than Western people because of social culture and family structure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experience of stigma as described by Taiwanese people living with schizophrenia and understand the interaction between patient and sociality. Methods: 12 people with schizophrenia at psychiatric day care in south Taiwan were recruited.  Each participant investigated with 25-item Psychiatric Stigma Scale and twice in-depth 40-minute interviews. Results: The average score of Psychiatric Stigma Scale was lower in people with schizophrenia. This meant that people with schizophrenia felt they seldomly had experiences of stigma. A narrative qualitative approach to inquiry formed the theoretical framework. Four core categories were explicated from the analysis of data: feeling isolation, caught in a dilemma, seeking religion, family desire. Conclusion: The findings could not only help psychiatric professional understood the experiences of stigma, but also provide timely interventions to reduce the phenomenon of stigma in our society.
Keywords:
day care centre; stigma; Schizophrenia
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experiences of Stigma As Described by Taiwanese People Living With Schizophreniaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKu, Yu-Huien_GB
dc.contributor.authorHong, Rei-Meien_GB
dc.contributor.authorSu, Ji-Anen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsYu-Hui Ku, RN, BSN, elevenguu@gmail.com; Rei-Mei Hong, RN, PhD; Ji-An Su, MD, MSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335627-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: Purpose: People with schizophrenia have chronic and regressive features which make patients remain partial residual symptoms even if patients have received regularly medication treatment. These symptoms not only cause discrimination and stigma but also influence patients’ psychology, marriage, interpersonal relationship, and occupation. For Chinese people, stigma may be much more serious and particularly significant than Western people because of social culture and family structure. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experience of stigma as described by Taiwanese people living with schizophrenia and understand the interaction between patient and sociality. Methods: 12 people with schizophrenia at psychiatric day care in south Taiwan were recruited.  Each participant investigated with 25-item Psychiatric Stigma Scale and twice in-depth 40-minute interviews. Results: The average score of Psychiatric Stigma Scale was lower in people with schizophrenia. This meant that people with schizophrenia felt they seldomly had experiences of stigma. A narrative qualitative approach to inquiry formed the theoretical framework. Four core categories were explicated from the analysis of data: feeling isolation, caught in a dilemma, seeking religion, family desire. Conclusion: The findings could not only help psychiatric professional understood the experiences of stigma, but also provide timely interventions to reduce the phenomenon of stigma in our society.en_GB
dc.subjectday care centreen_GB
dc.subjectstigmaen_GB
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:56:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:56:06Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is availabe in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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