The Role of Preparatory Activities in Clinical Education for the Pre-Licensure Nursing Student

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335640
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Preparatory Activities in Clinical Education for the Pre-Licensure Nursing Student
Author(s):
Turner, Laureen E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Gamma, Beta Gamma
Author Details:
Laureen E. Turner, MA, MSN, BSN, lturner@usfca.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: PERCEPTIONS OF PRECLINICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE PRE-LICENSURE NURSING STUDENT Purpose: This study explores preclinical preparation activities (PPA) in nursing education. Significance: The clinical environment represents the cornerstone of nursing education, where theory, psychomotor skills, and critical thinking converge. Existing literature demonstrates limited data on PPA.' This paper investigates forms and student perceptions regarding PPA. Methods: A survey tool was created in tandem with existing research and faculty consultation. This survey was distributed to students (N=541) and clinical faculty (N=94). 298 students and 34 faculty returned the survey. Analysis: Quantitative data was cleaned and analyzed using Stata 13. Qualitative student data was analyzed for underlying themes. Authors assessed internal validity by correlating similar questions (r = 0.6111). Results: The most common forms of PPA assignment included 'student assigned patient - student gathers information' (37.3 percent) and 'unit staff assigned patient - student gathers information' (33.6 percent). More than 50% of students agreed or strongly agreed with statements indicating PPA importance; however, mean comparison tests indicate no significant differences in perception of clinical activities between those who perform PPA and those who do not with the exception of sleep and clinical informatics skills. The study also analyzes the impact of PPA on stress and sleep, finding that students believe PPA increases stress and decreases sleep quantity. Conclusions: Factors affecting student perception of PPA include: timing of assignment, time spent on the assignment, stress, and anxiety. The findings suggest that students receive diminishing returns on time spent on PPA; nevertheless, PPA may indeed enhance learning and safety. Implications: The findings provide insight into the usefulness of PPA from a student perspective and explore how these activities might be conducted.
Keywords:
Preparation; Clinical; Education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
11 ; 11
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Role of Preparatory Activities in Clinical Education for the Pre-Licensure Nursing Studenten
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Laureen E.en
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Gamma, Beta Gammaen
dc.author.detailsLaureen E. Turner, MA, MSN, BSN, lturner@usfca.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335640-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, July 25, 2014: PERCEPTIONS OF PRECLINICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE PRE-LICENSURE NURSING STUDENT Purpose: This study explores preclinical preparation activities (PPA) in nursing education. Significance: The clinical environment represents the cornerstone of nursing education, where theory, psychomotor skills, and critical thinking converge. Existing literature demonstrates limited data on PPA.' This paper investigates forms and student perceptions regarding PPA. Methods: A survey tool was created in tandem with existing research and faculty consultation. This survey was distributed to students (N=541) and clinical faculty (N=94). 298 students and 34 faculty returned the survey. Analysis: Quantitative data was cleaned and analyzed using Stata 13. Qualitative student data was analyzed for underlying themes. Authors assessed internal validity by correlating similar questions (r = 0.6111). Results: The most common forms of PPA assignment included 'student assigned patient - student gathers information' (37.3 percent) and 'unit staff assigned patient - student gathers information' (33.6 percent). More than 50% of students agreed or strongly agreed with statements indicating PPA importance; however, mean comparison tests indicate no significant differences in perception of clinical activities between those who perform PPA and those who do not with the exception of sleep and clinical informatics skills. The study also analyzes the impact of PPA on stress and sleep, finding that students believe PPA increases stress and decreases sleep quantity. Conclusions: Factors affecting student perception of PPA include: timing of assignment, time spent on the assignment, stress, and anxiety. The findings suggest that students receive diminishing returns on time spent on PPA; nevertheless, PPA may indeed enhance learning and safety. Implications: The findings provide insight into the usefulness of PPA from a student perspective and explore how these activities might be conducted.en
dc.subjectPreparationen
dc.subjectClinicalen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.date.available2014-11-17T13:56:26Z-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014-
dc.date.issued11/17/2014en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T13:56:26Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen
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