Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons From U.S. and Hong Kong Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335706
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons From U.S. and Hong Kong Experience
Author(s):
Wong, Janet Yuen Ha
Author Details:
Janet Yuen Ha Wong PhD, RN, MNurs janetyh@hku.hk
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, or psychological violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Since the past decade, dating violence has been identified as an emerging public health issue among young couples and is linked to poor physical and mental health outcomes including injuries, depression, as well as behavioural problems such as suicidal attempts, eating disorders, unplanned pregnancies, and substance abuse. University students are at high risk for dating violence because they have time and space to socially interact with each other without parental guardianship. They may also cohabitate in the same building in dormitories, which increase the personal risk of being physically or sexually abused if the dating partner is abusive. Further, peers are often aware of dating violence but feel ill equipped to help and experience distress at helping. Limited research explores prevention efforts for older adolescents on dating violence and few programs use a community level, peer based approach. This symposium introduces two programmes, Friends Helping Friends in the United States and Dating Café Ambassadors Programme in Hong Kong. Both of them are bystander education programme which have been conducted to address the local needs to prevent dating violence in university campuses. Both programs were designed to provide education, training, and skills to enable older adolescents to help peers who are in dating violent relationships. The presenters will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the bystander, community level prevention strategies and report on the evaluation of each program. Program evaluation used a pre and post-test design to compare attitudes, beliefs, behaviours, and intention to act as a bystander between treatment and control groups. The presenters will also address challenges to conducting violence research; including human subjects concerns, cultural considerations, and population specific barriers. Implications for future research, campus policy, and clinical practice will be addressed.
Keywords:
University students, Dating violence, Bystander education
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpirically-Based Bystander Education Programmes to Prevent Dating Violence in University Students: Lessons From U.S. and Hong Kong Experienceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWong, Janet Yuen Haen_GB
dc.author.detailsJanet Yuen Ha Wong PhD, RN, MNurs janetyh@hku.hken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335706-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, or psychological violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Since the past decade, dating violence has been identified as an emerging public health issue among young couples and is linked to poor physical and mental health outcomes including injuries, depression, as well as behavioural problems such as suicidal attempts, eating disorders, unplanned pregnancies, and substance abuse. University students are at high risk for dating violence because they have time and space to socially interact with each other without parental guardianship. They may also cohabitate in the same building in dormitories, which increase the personal risk of being physically or sexually abused if the dating partner is abusive. Further, peers are often aware of dating violence but feel ill equipped to help and experience distress at helping. Limited research explores prevention efforts for older adolescents on dating violence and few programs use a community level, peer based approach. This symposium introduces two programmes, Friends Helping Friends in the United States and Dating Café Ambassadors Programme in Hong Kong. Both of them are bystander education programme which have been conducted to address the local needs to prevent dating violence in university campuses. Both programs were designed to provide education, training, and skills to enable older adolescents to help peers who are in dating violent relationships. The presenters will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the bystander, community level prevention strategies and report on the evaluation of each program. Program evaluation used a pre and post-test design to compare attitudes, beliefs, behaviours, and intention to act as a bystander between treatment and control groups. The presenters will also address challenges to conducting violence research; including human subjects concerns, cultural considerations, and population specific barriers. Implications for future research, campus policy, and clinical practice will be addressed.en_GB
dc.subjectUniversity students, Dating violence, Bystander educationen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T14:32:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T14:32:12Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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