Workplace Behaviors Affecting Patient Safety: Role of Nurses and Physicians as Partners in Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335708
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Behaviors Affecting Patient Safety: Role of Nurses and Physicians as Partners in Change
Author(s):
Brooks, Ann Marie T.
Author Details:
Ann Marie T. Brooks DNSc, RN, MBA, FAAN, FACHE, FNAP annmariebrooks@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Patient safety and quality are recognized as priorities in healthcare organizations across the care continuum. Nurses and physicians are identified as major influencers of these priorities in the U.S. and across the world. Collaboration and effective communication are essential to providing safe, patient focused and efficient care. Although both professions have made progress in building collaborative relationships and working together to achieve superior patient outcomes, the issue of disruptive behavior between nurses and physicians continues to interfere with patient safety and adversely affects teamwork in the work environment. All of the above contribute to errors and delayed treatment. The lack of acknowledgement that disruptive behavior is a serious problem in healthcare has led to environments of “willful blindness” in which leaders oftentimes either ignore the behavior or their attempts to resolve the issue are inadequate. This symposium will address disruptive behaviors between nurses and physicians using data collected from two healthcare systems in different parts of the U.S. The IRB approved survey results will be compared to the American Organization of Nurse Executive survey results and to the American College of Physician Executive findings. Each of the three presentations will focus on how the results were used to improve communication, collaboration and patient outcomes and how the data facilitated changes in behavioral expectations, education for both nurses and physicians and implementation of new performance measures as a process of recognition and strengthening shared accountability for teamwork and building and sustaining a positive work environment.
Keywords:
safety, nurses and physicians, interdependence
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Behaviors Affecting Patient Safety: Role of Nurses and Physicians as Partners in Changeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Ann Marie T.en_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn Marie T. Brooks DNSc, RN, MBA, FAAN, FACHE, FNAP annmariebrooks@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335708-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: Patient safety and quality are recognized as priorities in healthcare organizations across the care continuum. Nurses and physicians are identified as major influencers of these priorities in the U.S. and across the world. Collaboration and effective communication are essential to providing safe, patient focused and efficient care. Although both professions have made progress in building collaborative relationships and working together to achieve superior patient outcomes, the issue of disruptive behavior between nurses and physicians continues to interfere with patient safety and adversely affects teamwork in the work environment. All of the above contribute to errors and delayed treatment. The lack of acknowledgement that disruptive behavior is a serious problem in healthcare has led to environments of “willful blindness” in which leaders oftentimes either ignore the behavior or their attempts to resolve the issue are inadequate. This symposium will address disruptive behaviors between nurses and physicians using data collected from two healthcare systems in different parts of the U.S. The IRB approved survey results will be compared to the American Organization of Nurse Executive survey results and to the American College of Physician Executive findings. Each of the three presentations will focus on how the results were used to improve communication, collaboration and patient outcomes and how the data facilitated changes in behavioral expectations, education for both nurses and physicians and implementation of new performance measures as a process of recognition and strengthening shared accountability for teamwork and building and sustaining a positive work environment.en_GB
dc.subjectsafety, nurses and physicians, interdependenceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T14:32:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T14:32:14Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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