SPECIAL SESSION: Towards Improved Safety by Examining the Complexities of Health Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/335711
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SPECIAL SESSION: Towards Improved Safety by Examining the Complexities of Health Care
Author(s):
Manias, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Manias RN, MPharm, PhD emanias@unimelb.edu.au
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: The overarching theme of this special session is the need to consider the complexities of health care practice in order to make a difference and improve care. The focus of this special session is to examine three main areas of my research. These three areas comprise: communication in health care, medication adherence and patient safety. My work on communication in health care has involved the use of audio-recording and video-recording observations of how patients, family members, and health professionals interact with each other about managing medications in hospital settings. Critical ethnography has been effectively used in examining communication processes in ward rounds, handovers and informal interactions has contributed to repositioning and shifting researchers’ and health professionals’ thinking about the importance of observing actual clinical practice. Knowledge gained on these real experiences has been fed back to nurses and other health professionals in hospitals at the local level and contributed to changes in health professionals’ thinking and in medication activities. My communication research into medications has culminated in the development and publication of a conceptual framework on medication communication. This framework delineates the link between medication management and communication. It provides a structured approach in examining the defining attributes, environmental and sociocultural influences, and consequences of communication. In the area of medication adherence, I have collaborated to develop novel, consumer-centred interventions aimed at improving blood pressure and medication adherence for consumers with diabetic-kidney disease of English speaking and non-English speaking backgrounds, and consumers with osteoarthritis and other chronic conditions. These interventions have included video-recorded information of the barriers to medication-taking experienced by consumers and steps they have taken to resolve these barriers. Implementation of these interventions have led to improved medication-taking behaviours, better blood pressure control and improved patient engagement with health professionals about how to manage medications more effectively at home. Research in patient safety has involved development and evaluation of three risk screening tools: self-administration of medication by patients in hospital; the risk of representation to the emergency department by homeless people; and the risk of medication mismanagement by people of non-English speaking backgrounds. Prior to developing these tools, interviews and focus groups have been undertaken with patients and health professionals to determine their perspectives of the particular issue. Audits have been conducted to determine the effects of explanatory variables on outcomes variables. The resulting tools have been tested in the actual environments in which they are to be used, thereby enabling utility to be measured. These tools are used by nurses who work in rehabilitation units, outpatient units and emergency departments.
Keywords:
medication adherence, risk screening tools, medication communication
Repository Posting Date:
17-Nov-2014
Date of Publication:
17-Nov-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Hong Kong
Description:
International Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSPECIAL SESSION: Towards Improved Safety by Examining the Complexities of Health Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManias, Elizabethen_GB
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Manias RN, MPharm, PhD emanias@unimelb.edu.auen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/335711-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, July 26, 2014: The overarching theme of this special session is the need to consider the complexities of health care practice in order to make a difference and improve care. The focus of this special session is to examine three main areas of my research. These three areas comprise: communication in health care, medication adherence and patient safety. My work on communication in health care has involved the use of audio-recording and video-recording observations of how patients, family members, and health professionals interact with each other about managing medications in hospital settings. Critical ethnography has been effectively used in examining communication processes in ward rounds, handovers and informal interactions has contributed to repositioning and shifting researchers’ and health professionals’ thinking about the importance of observing actual clinical practice. Knowledge gained on these real experiences has been fed back to nurses and other health professionals in hospitals at the local level and contributed to changes in health professionals’ thinking and in medication activities. My communication research into medications has culminated in the development and publication of a conceptual framework on medication communication. This framework delineates the link between medication management and communication. It provides a structured approach in examining the defining attributes, environmental and sociocultural influences, and consequences of communication. In the area of medication adherence, I have collaborated to develop novel, consumer-centred interventions aimed at improving blood pressure and medication adherence for consumers with diabetic-kidney disease of English speaking and non-English speaking backgrounds, and consumers with osteoarthritis and other chronic conditions. These interventions have included video-recorded information of the barriers to medication-taking experienced by consumers and steps they have taken to resolve these barriers. Implementation of these interventions have led to improved medication-taking behaviours, better blood pressure control and improved patient engagement with health professionals about how to manage medications more effectively at home. Research in patient safety has involved development and evaluation of three risk screening tools: self-administration of medication by patients in hospital; the risk of representation to the emergency department by homeless people; and the risk of medication mismanagement by people of non-English speaking backgrounds. Prior to developing these tools, interviews and focus groups have been undertaken with patients and health professionals to determine their perspectives of the particular issue. Audits have been conducted to determine the effects of explanatory variables on outcomes variables. The resulting tools have been tested in the actual environments in which they are to be used, thereby enabling utility to be measured. These tools are used by nurses who work in rehabilitation units, outpatient units and emergency departments.en_GB
dc.subjectmedication adherence, risk screening tools, medication communicationen_GB
dc.date.available2014-11-17T14:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-17-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T14:32:16Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name25th International Nursing Research Congress, 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationHong Kongen_GB
dc.descriptionInternational Nursing Research Congress, 2014 Theme: Engaging Colleagues: Improving Global Health Outcomes. Held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wanchai, Hong Kongen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submited a full-text item related to this abstract, you may find it by browsing the repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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