2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338244
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advocacy: Are You Prepared?
Other Titles:
Advocating for Nursing Changes
Author(s):
Mueller, Dale M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi Theta
Author Details:
Dale Mueller, EdD, MS, RN, NEA-BC, NHA, dmueller@csudh.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: The initial purpose of the research was to assess curriculum effectiveness on the topic of the nurses role as advocate in a Health Care Policy course through pre- and post-test scores on the Political Astuteness Inventory (PAI) (Clark, 1984). A secondary purpose at this time is that the findings of the initial study can serve to inform all nurses as to how to participate more fully as advocates to benefit the profession, current and future patients, communities and the nation as a whole. Methods: Pre- and post-tests were made available to RN-to-BSN students enrolled in a 12-week senior level Health Care Policy course. In addition to questions on the Political Astuteness Inventory (PAI), demographics were collected. The study was approved by the University IRB. Results: Post-test scores did improve after exposure to course material, however, knowledge gaps were persistent in pre-test scores when sorted by demographics such as age, gender, and length of time licensed as an RN. Pre-test scores (n=197) included the following in terms of knowledge gaps: 89% are not involved in professional organizations; 85% did not know how to contact a lobbyist; 87% were registered to vote but only 57% could identify health care issues being discussed at the national or state level; 43% voted in local elections; 85% did not know which elected officials were supportive of nursing; 93% did not know on which committees their elected officials were serving; 62% did not know how a bill becomes a law in the state legislature; only 3% were acquainted with a senator or representative. Conclusion: Given that participation in political processes are effective means of advocacy and are not dependent upon taking a health policy course, information about political astuteness would be of benefit to clinicians, managers, administrators, leaders and educators. Political processes where nurses can be involved include voting, advising elected officials, proposing new legislation and adding public comments on proposed legislation, serving on appointed committees, educating colleagues and friends, and many other endeavors that are consistent with participation in a democratic society.
Keywords:
advocacy; leadership; change agents
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14LC02
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAdvocacy: Are You Prepared?en_US
dc.title.alternativeAdvocating for Nursing Changesen
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Dale M.en
dc.contributor.departmentXi Thetaen
dc.author.detailsDale Mueller, EdD, MS, RN, NEA-BC, NHA, dmueller@csudh.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338244-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: The initial purpose of the research was to assess curriculum effectiveness on the topic of the nurses role as advocate in a Health Care Policy course through pre- and post-test scores on the Political Astuteness Inventory (PAI) (Clark, 1984). A secondary purpose at this time is that the findings of the initial study can serve to inform all nurses as to how to participate more fully as advocates to benefit the profession, current and future patients, communities and the nation as a whole. Methods: Pre- and post-tests were made available to RN-to-BSN students enrolled in a 12-week senior level Health Care Policy course. In addition to questions on the Political Astuteness Inventory (PAI), demographics were collected. The study was approved by the University IRB. Results: Post-test scores did improve after exposure to course material, however, knowledge gaps were persistent in pre-test scores when sorted by demographics such as age, gender, and length of time licensed as an RN. Pre-test scores (n=197) included the following in terms of knowledge gaps: 89% are not involved in professional organizations; 85% did not know how to contact a lobbyist; 87% were registered to vote but only 57% could identify health care issues being discussed at the national or state level; 43% voted in local elections; 85% did not know which elected officials were supportive of nursing; 93% did not know on which committees their elected officials were serving; 62% did not know how a bill becomes a law in the state legislature; only 3% were acquainted with a senator or representative. Conclusion: Given that participation in political processes are effective means of advocacy and are not dependent upon taking a health policy course, information about political astuteness would be of benefit to clinicians, managers, administrators, leaders and educators. Political processes where nurses can be involved include voting, advising elected officials, proposing new legislation and adding public comments on proposed legislation, serving on appointed committees, educating colleagues and friends, and many other endeavors that are consistent with participation in a democratic society.en
dc.subjectadvocacyen
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.subjectchange agentsen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:34:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:34:14Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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