The Dynamic Effect of Work Relations on Nurses' Well Being and Patient Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338297
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Dynamic Effect of Work Relations on Nurses' Well Being and Patient Safety
Author(s):
Carroll, Bernadette
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-Member
Author Details:
Bernadette Carroll, MS, BSN, berniec@umich.edu
Abstract:
Session presented on Thursday, September 25, 2014: TITLE: The Dynamic Effect of Work Relations on Nurses Well Being and Patient Safety. Author: Bernadette Carroll RN, MS, BSN, NEA-BC. BACKGROUND: In 2008, the Joint Commission issued a sentinel event alert related to the significance of intimidating and disruptive behaviors in healthcare settings. The presence of these behaviors may lead to medical errors (Rosenstein et al., 2005; Institute for Safe Medication Practices: Survey on workplace intimidation, 2003; Gerardi, 2007), poor patient satisfaction (Rosenstein, 2005, Gerardi, 2007), increase costs of care (Gerardi, 2007) and an increase in turnover among qualified clinicians, administrators and managers (Rosenstein et al, 2005; Rosenstein et al, 2002). PURPOSE: To investigate the time varying effects of disruptive and supportive behaviors targeted at nurses by focusing on consequences pertaining to both the nurse and the patient. It is hypothesized that disruptive and supportive behaviors directly affect the health and well being of nurses, which in turn affects patient safety and satisfaction. The proposed research will follow nurses from the emergency center, various inpatient medical units, and an outpatient short stay setting over a 3 month time period. GOAL: To identify mechanisms that explain the dynamic effect of disruptive behaviors from peers and supervisors on nurses well being and patient safety. Further, to shed new light on when nurses are most vulnerable to the adverse effect of disruptive behaviors. METHODS: A longitudinal research design will be used to assess the prevalence of disruptive and supportive behaviors through weekly on line surveys. The consequences evaluated and documented are a wide range of disruptive and supportive behaviors on nurses (e.g., emotional well being, turn-over, leave of absences, sick time, staff engagement and staff satisfaction), units (e.g., cohesiveness, cooperation, and attending the units goals), and patients (e.g., safety, patient and family satisfaction). The proposed model seeks to provide a framework for understanding how the individuals personal attributes (values, ethnicity, age, tenure on the unit, level of education, and training); situational factors (quality of work environment, psychological climate, social support team dynamics, cohesiveness, supervisor relationships); and the interactions between them might attenuate the prevalence and effects of disruptive behaviors.
Keywords:
Disruptive behaviors; Patient safety; Nurse Well being
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14PST37
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Dynamic Effect of Work Relations on Nurses' Well Being and Patient Safetyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Bernadetteen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-Memberen
dc.author.detailsBernadette Carroll, MS, BSN, berniec@umich.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338297-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Thursday, September 25, 2014: TITLE: The Dynamic Effect of Work Relations on Nurses Well Being and Patient Safety. Author: Bernadette Carroll RN, MS, BSN, NEA-BC. BACKGROUND: In 2008, the Joint Commission issued a sentinel event alert related to the significance of intimidating and disruptive behaviors in healthcare settings. The presence of these behaviors may lead to medical errors (Rosenstein et al., 2005; Institute for Safe Medication Practices: Survey on workplace intimidation, 2003; Gerardi, 2007), poor patient satisfaction (Rosenstein, 2005, Gerardi, 2007), increase costs of care (Gerardi, 2007) and an increase in turnover among qualified clinicians, administrators and managers (Rosenstein et al, 2005; Rosenstein et al, 2002). PURPOSE: To investigate the time varying effects of disruptive and supportive behaviors targeted at nurses by focusing on consequences pertaining to both the nurse and the patient. It is hypothesized that disruptive and supportive behaviors directly affect the health and well being of nurses, which in turn affects patient safety and satisfaction. The proposed research will follow nurses from the emergency center, various inpatient medical units, and an outpatient short stay setting over a 3 month time period. GOAL: To identify mechanisms that explain the dynamic effect of disruptive behaviors from peers and supervisors on nurses well being and patient safety. Further, to shed new light on when nurses are most vulnerable to the adverse effect of disruptive behaviors. METHODS: A longitudinal research design will be used to assess the prevalence of disruptive and supportive behaviors through weekly on line surveys. The consequences evaluated and documented are a wide range of disruptive and supportive behaviors on nurses (e.g., emotional well being, turn-over, leave of absences, sick time, staff engagement and staff satisfaction), units (e.g., cohesiveness, cooperation, and attending the units goals), and patients (e.g., safety, patient and family satisfaction). The proposed model seeks to provide a framework for understanding how the individuals personal attributes (values, ethnicity, age, tenure on the unit, level of education, and training); situational factors (quality of work environment, psychological climate, social support team dynamics, cohesiveness, supervisor relationships); and the interactions between them might attenuate the prevalence and effects of disruptive behaviors.en
dc.subjectDisruptive behaviorsen
dc.subjectPatient safetyen
dc.subjectNurse Well beingen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:34:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:34:58Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.