2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338346
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Equipping for Leadership: A Key Mentoring Practice
Other Titles:
Engaging Leadership Through Connections
Author(s):
Eliades, Aris; Weese, Meghan; Huth, Jennifer; Jakubik, Louise D.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Xi
Author Details:
Aris Eliades, PhD, RN, CNS, aeliades@chmca.org; Meghan Weese, MSN, RN, CPN; Jennifer Huth, BSN, RN, CPN; Louise D. Jakubik, PhD, RN-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: Previous studies examining predictors of mentoring benefits among pediatric staff nurse protgs representing healthcare organizations across 26 states demonstrated that protg perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations to promote the mutual benefits of mentoring. The primary aim of the study was to determine if mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits. In addition, the researchers were interested in exploring the relationship between the subscales of mentoring practices and benefits. Methods: This descriptive, correlational, non-experimental study of 186 nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital was conducted using survey methodology. The online survey contained demographic items, items on mentoring experiences, and two valid and reliable instruments, the Mentoring Practices Inventory (MPI) (Cronbachs alpha = 0.98) and Mentoring Benefits Inventory (MBI) (Cronbachs alpha = 0.98). The MPI measured the independent variable, mentoring practices, and the MBI measured the dependent variable, mentoring benefits. Results: The research hypothesis that mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits was supported and the correlation between total mentoring practices and total mentoring benefits was .89 (p<0.01).The mentoring practice of equipping of leadership predicted five mentoring benefits: Belonging (adjusted R2=0.591, p=.049), Career Optimism (adjusted R2=0.747, p=.003), Professional Growth (adjusted R2=0.737, p=.000), Security (adjusted R2=0.771, p=.000), and Leadership Readiness (adjusted R2=0.567, p=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that mentoring initiatives should consider the strong role of the mentoring practice equipping for leadership in predicting overall mentoring benefits. During a time in healthcare when nursing leaders are needed to transform care and care delivery, it is interesting and practically significant that this research study demonstrated that equipping for leadership was the most prevalent mentoring practice promoting the benefits of mentoring. This finding suggests that there is a connection between the science of developing people through mentoring and the science of leadership development. Further research is needed to explore this finding.
Keywords:
Mentoring; Research; Leadership
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14LC03
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleEquipping for Leadership: A Key Mentoring Practiceen_US
dc.title.alternativeEngaging Leadership Through Connectionsen
dc.contributor.authorEliades, Arisen
dc.contributor.authorWeese, Meghanen
dc.contributor.authorHuth, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorJakubik, Louise D.en
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Xien
dc.author.detailsAris Eliades, PhD, RN, CNS, aeliades@chmca.org; Meghan Weese, MSN, RN, CPN; Jennifer Huth, BSN, RN, CPN; Louise D. Jakubik, PhD, RN-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338346-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: Previous studies examining predictors of mentoring benefits among pediatric staff nurse protgs representing healthcare organizations across 26 states demonstrated that protg perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations to promote the mutual benefits of mentoring. The primary aim of the study was to determine if mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits. In addition, the researchers were interested in exploring the relationship between the subscales of mentoring practices and benefits. Methods: This descriptive, correlational, non-experimental study of 186 nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital was conducted using survey methodology. The online survey contained demographic items, items on mentoring experiences, and two valid and reliable instruments, the Mentoring Practices Inventory (MPI) (Cronbachs alpha = 0.98) and Mentoring Benefits Inventory (MBI) (Cronbachs alpha = 0.98). The MPI measured the independent variable, mentoring practices, and the MBI measured the dependent variable, mentoring benefits. Results: The research hypothesis that mentoring practices predict mentoring benefits was supported and the correlation between total mentoring practices and total mentoring benefits was .89 (p<0.01).The mentoring practice of equipping of leadership predicted five mentoring benefits: Belonging (adjusted R2=0.591, p=.049), Career Optimism (adjusted R2=0.747, p=.003), Professional Growth (adjusted R2=0.737, p=.000), Security (adjusted R2=0.771, p=.000), and Leadership Readiness (adjusted R2=0.567, p=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that mentoring initiatives should consider the strong role of the mentoring practice equipping for leadership in predicting overall mentoring benefits. During a time in healthcare when nursing leaders are needed to transform care and care delivery, it is interesting and practically significant that this research study demonstrated that equipping for leadership was the most prevalent mentoring practice promoting the benefits of mentoring. This finding suggests that there is a connection between the science of developing people through mentoring and the science of leadership development. Further research is needed to explore this finding.en
dc.subjectMentoringen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:35:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:35:58Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.