2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338348
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Structure and Process for Interdisciplinary Education
Other Titles:
Executive Academic Leadership
Author(s):
Haggerty Davis, Janet
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Lambda
Author Details:
Janet Haggerty Davis, BSN,MS, MBA, PhD, RN, drjhd@comcast.net
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: Due to the complexity of our current and emerging health care system, emphasis is increasingly being placed on the need for student education in interdisciplinary health care teams. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines interdisciplinary education as "when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes." Models for interdisciplinary education have been developed and some institutions have provided interdisciplinary education using case-based scenarios. The WHO proposes that interprofessional education is a necessary step in preparing a collaborative ready healthcare workforce.Programmaticaccreditation standards provide a public record of a profession'sinterdisciplinary values and beliefs. Methods: The Council of Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) is a primary national voice for accreditation and quality assurance to the US Congress and the US Department of Education. It serves as a national voice for accreditation to the general public, opinion leaders and students. It is also represents the US accreditation community to international audiences. CHEA recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting organizations. Twenty-three of these organizations are human health-related. To identify interdisciplinary education programmatic standards, a content analysis of these 23 human health-related CHEA programmatic accreditation standards sets was conducted. Four (4) key words were used (interprofessional, interdisciplinary, intraprofessional, multidisciplinary) to locate potentially relevant statements within each accreditation organization's standards and guidelines documents. Identified statements were categorized as accountable, non-accountable or non-applicable. Results: Accreditation standards for 11 health professions included the reference words of interprofessional, interdisciplinary, intraprofessional or multidiciplinary. The expectation that students are educated regarding interdisciplinary teams was evident in two disciplines, Nursing and Pharmacy, but the outcomes for these professions'respective standards werenot measurable. No structure or process expectations in the standards to support interdisciplinary education were evident. Conclusion: The majority of todays faculty are not credentialed to support interdisciplinary teaching as they were educated in a system reflecting traditional, professional silos. Accreditation standards do not specify the dean's role or the programmatic advisory board's role in supporting interdisciplinary education. The purposeful cultivation of skills built on the values and ethics for interdisciplinary practice requires programmatic accreditation structure and process mandated support.
Keywords:
Interdisciplinary; Programmatic accreditation
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14LC01
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleStructure and Process for Interdisciplinary Educationen_US
dc.title.alternativeExecutive Academic Leadershipen
dc.contributor.authorHaggerty Davis, Janeten
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Lambdaen
dc.author.detailsJanet Haggerty Davis, BSN,MS, MBA, PhD, RN, drjhd@comcast.neten
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338348-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, September 26, 2014: Purpose: Due to the complexity of our current and emerging health care system, emphasis is increasingly being placed on the need for student education in interdisciplinary health care teams. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines interdisciplinary education as "when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes." Models for interdisciplinary education have been developed and some institutions have provided interdisciplinary education using case-based scenarios. The WHO proposes that interprofessional education is a necessary step in preparing a collaborative ready healthcare workforce.Programmaticaccreditation standards provide a public record of a profession'sinterdisciplinary values and beliefs. Methods: The Council of Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) is a primary national voice for accreditation and quality assurance to the US Congress and the US Department of Education. It serves as a national voice for accreditation to the general public, opinion leaders and students. It is also represents the US accreditation community to international audiences. CHEA recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting organizations. Twenty-three of these organizations are human health-related. To identify interdisciplinary education programmatic standards, a content analysis of these 23 human health-related CHEA programmatic accreditation standards sets was conducted. Four (4) key words were used (interprofessional, interdisciplinary, intraprofessional, multidisciplinary) to locate potentially relevant statements within each accreditation organization's standards and guidelines documents. Identified statements were categorized as accountable, non-accountable or non-applicable. Results: Accreditation standards for 11 health professions included the reference words of interprofessional, interdisciplinary, intraprofessional or multidiciplinary. The expectation that students are educated regarding interdisciplinary teams was evident in two disciplines, Nursing and Pharmacy, but the outcomes for these professions'respective standards werenot measurable. No structure or process expectations in the standards to support interdisciplinary education were evident. Conclusion: The majority of todays faculty are not credentialed to support interdisciplinary teaching as they were educated in a system reflecting traditional, professional silos. Accreditation standards do not specify the dean's role or the programmatic advisory board's role in supporting interdisciplinary education. The purposeful cultivation of skills built on the values and ethics for interdisciplinary practice requires programmatic accreditation structure and process mandated support.en
dc.subjectInterdisciplinaryen
dc.subjectProgrammatic accreditationen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:36:01Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:36:01Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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