Analysis of Improvement in Nurse Leaders' Professional Presentation Skills Following a Unique Educational Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/338366
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analysis of Improvement in Nurse Leaders' Professional Presentation Skills Following a Unique Educational Intervention
Other Titles:
Essential Clinical Leadershiph Skills
Author(s):
Fowler, Debra L.; Jones, Deborah J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Pi
Author Details:
Debra L. Fowler, PhD, MBA, MSN, BSN, debra.l.fowler@uth.tmc.edu; Deborah J. Jones, PhD, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, September 27, 2014: Purpose: Expert communication skills are essential for nurse leaders to effectively influence health care delivery at institutional, community, national, and global levels. Communicating a concise message to an audience that results in complete understanding or a change in opinion is essential. Faculty and communication experts developed and implemented an educational strategy designed to promote development of effective professionalpresentation skills for students in an MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administration program. Methods: Sixteen students in an MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administrationcohort were participants in a 3-session professional presentation skills workshop. Before the workshop, students completed a self-assessment of their perceived presentation skills effectiveness using a tool with a Likert scale ranging from 1, strongly disagree, to 5, strongly agree. During the initial workshop session, students gave a pre-intervention presentation. In the second session, faculty taught strategies, skills, and visual aids necessary to present an effective, efficient, and quality presentation to a professional audience. Participants gave a post-intervention presentation in the third and final workshop session. A team of evaluators, including school of nursing faculty and a communication expert, used a standardized assessment form with a Likert scale ranging from 1, strongly disagree, to 5, strongly agree, to rate each presentation focusing on the introduction, body of the talk, visuals, delivery, conclusion, time management, and overall effectiveness. Following each presentation, evaluators provided immediate verbal critique of the presentation. Students in the classroom, as well as the person presenting, were also invited to participate in the critique. After completing the workshop series, students again completed the self-assessment of their perceived presentation skills effectiveness. Results: Using a pre-test/post-test design, data from the evaluators were analyzed for changes in each subscale; introduction, body of the talk, visuals, delivery, conclusion, time management, and overall effectiveness. Analysis of evaluators ratings shows statistically significant (p < .001) increases in students overall presentation effectiveness and for all workshop assessment subscales. Mean scores of students self-assessment of the overall effectiveness of their presentations prior to the workshop was 3.07 and 3.79 at the conclusion of the curriculum. Analysis of student self-ratings show a statistically significant (p = .008) increase in perceived effectiveness of their overall presentation skills.Anecdotal data from graduates of the program have indicated a high level of self-confidence and skill regarding professional presentations in their work settings as well as in conference podium presentations. Conclusion: The presentation skills workshop has added value to the MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administrationcurriculum. It has advanced the goal of preparing the next generation of nurse leaders to effect important changes in the health care system. Based on the analysis of the student and faculty outcomes for the first cohort, it is evident this unique educational intervention improved emerging nurse leaders presentation skills. Based on this success, the workshop has been implemented in subsequent cohorts. While similar results are anticipated, the workshop is continually evaluated to ensure effectiveness.
Keywords:
emerging nurse leaders; professional presentation skills
Repository Posting Date:
15-Jan-2015
Date of Publication:
15-Jan-2015
Other Identifiers:
LEAD14LD01
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Leadership Summit 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Leadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleAnalysis of Improvement in Nurse Leaders' Professional Presentation Skills Following a Unique Educational Interventionen_US
dc.title.alternativeEssential Clinical Leadershiph Skillsen
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Debra L.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, Deborah J.en
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Pien
dc.author.detailsDebra L. Fowler, PhD, MBA, MSN, BSN, debra.l.fowler@uth.tmc.edu; Deborah J. Jones, PhD, MSN, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/338366-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, September 27, 2014: Purpose: Expert communication skills are essential for nurse leaders to effectively influence health care delivery at institutional, community, national, and global levels. Communicating a concise message to an audience that results in complete understanding or a change in opinion is essential. Faculty and communication experts developed and implemented an educational strategy designed to promote development of effective professionalpresentation skills for students in an MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administration program. Methods: Sixteen students in an MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administrationcohort were participants in a 3-session professional presentation skills workshop. Before the workshop, students completed a self-assessment of their perceived presentation skills effectiveness using a tool with a Likert scale ranging from 1, strongly disagree, to 5, strongly agree. During the initial workshop session, students gave a pre-intervention presentation. In the second session, faculty taught strategies, skills, and visual aids necessary to present an effective, efficient, and quality presentation to a professional audience. Participants gave a post-intervention presentation in the third and final workshop session. A team of evaluators, including school of nursing faculty and a communication expert, used a standardized assessment form with a Likert scale ranging from 1, strongly disagree, to 5, strongly agree, to rate each presentation focusing on the introduction, body of the talk, visuals, delivery, conclusion, time management, and overall effectiveness. Following each presentation, evaluators provided immediate verbal critique of the presentation. Students in the classroom, as well as the person presenting, were also invited to participate in the critique. After completing the workshop series, students again completed the self-assessment of their perceived presentation skills effectiveness. Results: Using a pre-test/post-test design, data from the evaluators were analyzed for changes in each subscale; introduction, body of the talk, visuals, delivery, conclusion, time management, and overall effectiveness. Analysis of evaluators ratings shows statistically significant (p < .001) increases in students overall presentation effectiveness and for all workshop assessment subscales. Mean scores of students self-assessment of the overall effectiveness of their presentations prior to the workshop was 3.07 and 3.79 at the conclusion of the curriculum. Analysis of student self-ratings show a statistically significant (p = .008) increase in perceived effectiveness of their overall presentation skills.Anecdotal data from graduates of the program have indicated a high level of self-confidence and skill regarding professional presentations in their work settings as well as in conference podium presentations. Conclusion: The presentation skills workshop has added value to the MSN in Nursing Leadership and Administrationcurriculum. It has advanced the goal of preparing the next generation of nurse leaders to effect important changes in the health care system. Based on the analysis of the student and faculty outcomes for the first cohort, it is evident this unique educational intervention improved emerging nurse leaders presentation skills. Based on this success, the workshop has been implemented in subsequent cohorts. While similar results are anticipated, the workshop is continually evaluated to ensure effectiveness.en
dc.subjectemerging nurse leadersen
dc.subjectprofessional presentation skillsen
dc.date.available2015-01-15T13:36:20Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-15-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-15T13:36:20Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameLeadership Summit 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionLeadership Summit 2014 Theme: Personal. Professional. Global. Held at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis.en
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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